Special Issue "Recent Advances in Papillomaviruses Research"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Viruses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Thomas Iftner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Medical Virology, Universität Tübingen, Tubingen, Germany
Interests: papillomaviruses
Dr. Frank Stubenrauch
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Medical Virology, Universität Tübingen, Tubingen, Germany
Interests: papillomaviruses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Persistent infections with high risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) account for more than 600.000 newly diagnosed cancers of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract annually. Although much information has been gathered from laboratory and clinical investigations, we still have an incomplete picture of the critical interactions of HPV with host cells and the immune system. This Special Issue on Recent Advances in Papillomaviruses Research in Viruses will provide a multifaceted view of the latest research into papillomaviruses. Each chapter in this series will highlight the efforts and progress made to acquire basic knowledge of HPV host interactions and will indicate particular areas that remain to be uncovered. Topics in this new series include the processes of HPV entry into keratinocytes, HPV and the DNA damage response, BRD4 proteins in the HPV life cycle, different animal papillomavirus model systems as well as updates on L2- based prophylactic vaccines and on improved HPV diagnostics.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Iftner
Prof. Dr. Frank Stubenrauch
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • papillomavirus
  • virus entry
  • DNA Damage response
  • vaccine
  • virus-host-interaction
  • HPV diagnostics
  • cancer
  • animal models

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Review
Human Papillomaviruses Target the DNA Damage Repair and Innate Immune Response Pathways to Allow for Persistent Infection
Viruses 2021, 13(7), 1390; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13071390 - 17 Jul 2021
Viewed by 644
Abstract
Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the major risk factor associated with development of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. Initial infection by HPVs occurs into basal epithelial cells where viral genomes are established as nuclear episomes and persist until cleared by the [...] Read more.
Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the major risk factor associated with development of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. Initial infection by HPVs occurs into basal epithelial cells where viral genomes are established as nuclear episomes and persist until cleared by the immune response. Productive replication or amplification occurs upon differentiation and is dependent upon activation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ataxia telangiectasia and RAD3-related (ATR) DNA damage repair (DDR) pathways. In addition to activating DDR pathways, HPVs must escape innate immune surveillance mechanisms by antagonizing sensors, adaptors, interferons and antiviral gene expression. Both DDR and innate immune pathways are key host mechanisms that crosstalk with each other to maintain homeostasis of cells persistently infected with HPVs. Interestingly, it is still not fully understood why some HPV infections get cleared while others do not. Targeting of these two processes with antiviral therapies may provide opportunities for treatment of cancers caused by high-risk HPVs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Papillomaviruses Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop