Special Issue "Phage-Plant Interactions"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Bacterial Viruses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Bin Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
Interests: phage–bacterial; pathogen–plant; plant bacteriophage research; bacteriophage genomics; phage–host interactions; phage cocktails
Dr. Temoor Ahmed
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
Interests: plant bacteriophage research; plant–microbiome interaction; green nanotechnology; environmental biotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Viruses is pleased to announce the creation of a collection of feature articles “phage-plant interaction”. The aim of this Special Issue is to call for recent advances in the interaction mechanism of bacteriophages with bacterial plant pathogens or symbiotic bacteria found in plant environments. Studies focusing on the application of bacteriophages in agriculture, e.g., on plants in the greenhouse or on fields, are also welcome.

One of the main challenges in plant disease control is environmental concerns when using pesticides and the resistance of plant pathogenic bacteria to bactericide, which makes it necessary to develop a sustainable, ecofriendly, and economically affordable solution. Phages are biological molecules that do not contaminate the environment and are easily produced at low cost. Yet, they are highly efficient in inactivating bacterial pathogens and thus hold promise as efficient biocontrol agents. We welcome the submission of manuscripts from all scientists in this field, including those from Editorial Board Members and from scholars invited by the Editorial Board and the Editorial Office. Short proposals for the submission of feature papers are also welcome. Please send proposals to the Viruses Editorial Office ([email protected])  and Mango Shen ([email protected]) for evaluation. 

Prof. Dr. Bin Li
Dr. Sebastian Leptihn
Dr. Temoor Ahmed
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • phage
  • plant
  • interaction
  • biocontrol
  • plant pathogenic bacteria
  • phage cocktail

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Identification and Characterization of a New Type of Holin-Endolysin Lysis Cassette in Acidovorax oryzae Phage AP1
Viruses 2022, 14(2), 167; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v14020167 - 18 Jan 2022
Viewed by 107
Abstract
Phages utilize lysis systems to allow the release of newly assembled viral particles that kill the bacterial host. This is also the case for phage AP1, which infects the rice pathogen Acidovorax oryzae. However, how lysis occurs on a molecular level is [...] Read more.
Phages utilize lysis systems to allow the release of newly assembled viral particles that kill the bacterial host. This is also the case for phage AP1, which infects the rice pathogen Acidovorax oryzae. However, how lysis occurs on a molecular level is currently unknown. We performed in silico bioinformatics analyses, which indicated that the lysis cassette contains a holin (HolAP) and endolysin (LysAP), which are encoded by two adjacent genes. Recombinant expression of LysAP caused Escherichia coli lysis, while HolAP arrested growth. Co-expression of both proteins resulted in enhanced lysis activity compared to the individual proteins alone. Interestingly, LysAP contains a C-terminal region transmembrane domain, which is different from most known endolysins where a N-terminal hydrophobic region is found, with the potential to insert into the membrane. We show that the C-terminal transmembrane domain is crucial for protein localization and bacterial lysis in phage AP1. Our study characterizes the new phage lysis cassette and the mechanism to induce cell disruption, giving new insight in the understanding of phage life cycles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phage-Plant Interactions)
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Review

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Review
Deploying Viruses against Phytobacteria: Potential Use of Phage Cocktails as a Multifaceted Approach to Combat Resistant Bacterial Plant Pathogens
Viruses 2022, 14(2), 171; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v14020171 - 18 Jan 2022
Viewed by 181
Abstract
Plants in nature are under the persistent intimidation of severe microbial diseases, threatening a sustainable food production system. Plant-bacterial pathogens are a major concern in the contemporary era, resulting in reduced plant growth and productivity. Plant antibiotics and chemical-based bactericides have been extensively [...] Read more.
Plants in nature are under the persistent intimidation of severe microbial diseases, threatening a sustainable food production system. Plant-bacterial pathogens are a major concern in the contemporary era, resulting in reduced plant growth and productivity. Plant antibiotics and chemical-based bactericides have been extensively used to evade plant bacterial diseases. To counteract this pressure, bacteria have evolved an array of resistance mechanisms, including innate and adaptive immune systems. The emergence of resistant bacteria and detrimental consequences of antimicrobial compounds on the environment and human health, accentuates the development of an alternative disease evacuation strategy. The phage cocktail therapy is a multidimensional approach effectively employed for the biocontrol of diverse resistant bacterial infections without affecting the fauna and flora. Phages engage a diverse set of counter defense strategies to undermine wide-ranging anti-phage defense mechanisms of bacterial pathogens. Microbial ecology, evolution, and dynamics of the interactions between phage and plant-bacterial pathogens lead to the engineering of robust phage cocktail therapeutics for the mitigation of devastating phytobacterial diseases. In this review, we highlight the concrete and fundamental determinants in the development and application of phage cocktails and their underlying mechanism, combating resistant plant-bacterial pathogens. Additionally, we provide recent advances in the use of phage cocktail therapy against phytobacteria for the biocontrol of devastating plant diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phage-Plant Interactions)
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