Special Issue "The Scale Effects of Green Infrastructures on Urban Stormwater Runoff"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mingfu Guan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Interests: urban flood; flood modelling; urban hydrology; stormwater management; green infrastructures; river and coastal hydraulics; sediment dynamics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Sangaralingam Ahilan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Water Systems, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
Interests: floodplain hydraulics; flood frequency analysis; flood and sediment modelling; rainwater management; urban water management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urbanisation dramatically changes natural catchment characteristics by increasing impervious areas and creating artificial drainage systems. These anthropogenic activities, therefore, result in significant adverse hydrobioecological consequences, such as flash runoff, reduced natural stormwater recharge and storage, and deteriorated stormwater quality. To offset these adverse effects, nature-based stormwater management techniques, such as green infrastructures (GIs), have been increasingly considered as potential options. The benefits of GIs on urban stormwater vary not only according to their features but also their spatial and temporal scales. Systems within a system interact with each other, and a measure may lose its effectiveness after a certain period of usage. Nonetheless, there are still challenging research questions that remain to be explored regarding the performance of GIs at varying spatiotemporal scales, for example: How and to what extent do GIs affect urban stormwater runoff from the perspective of catchment scale and long-term scale? Which is the better modelling approach to quantify urban stormwater and their interactions with green and grey infrastructures at different spatial and temporal scales? How to maximise the benefits of GIs in an urban catchment?

For this Special Issue, we welcome papers on GIs and their evaluation in urban stormwater management at different spatiotemporal scales, including local, regional, city, and catchment scales as well as short-event and long-term scales. We also invite contributions that describe advanced modelling approaches to better simulate the physical processes of urban stormwater at different scales.

Dr. Mingfu Guan
Dr. Sangaralingam Ahilan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • green infrastructures
  • urbanisation
  • urban stormwater
  • rainfall runoff
  • hydrological modelling
  • spatiotemporal scale

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Towards Regional Scale Stormwater Flood Management Strategies through Rapid Preliminary Intervention Screening
Water 2021, 13(15), 2027; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w13152027 - 24 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1264
Abstract
This paper presents the advantages and opportunities for rapid preliminary intervention screening to enhance inclusion of green infrastructures in regional scale stormwater management. Stormwater flooding is widely recognised as a significant and worsening natural hazard across the globe; however, current management approaches aimed [...] Read more.
This paper presents the advantages and opportunities for rapid preliminary intervention screening to enhance inclusion of green infrastructures in regional scale stormwater management. Stormwater flooding is widely recognised as a significant and worsening natural hazard across the globe; however, current management approaches aimed at the site scale do not adequately explore opportunities for integrated management at the regional scale at which decisions are made. This research addresses this gap through supporting the development of stormwater management strategies, including green infrastructure, at a regional scale. This is achieved through upscaling a modelling approach using a spatially explicit inundation model (CADDIES) coupled with an economic model of inundation loss (OpenProFIA) to support widescale evaluation of green infrastructure during the informative early-stage development of stormwater management strategies. This novel regional scale approach is demonstrated across a case study of the San Francisco Bay Area, spanning 8300 sq km. The main opportunity from this regional approach is to identify spatial and temporal trends which are used to inform regional planning and direct future detailed modelling efforts. The study highlights several limitations of the new method, suggesting it should be applied as part of a suite of landscape management approaches; however, highlights that it has the potential to complement existing stormwater management toolkits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Scale Effects of Green Infrastructures on Urban Stormwater Runoff)
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