Special Issue "Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Long Ho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Aquatic Ecology Research Unit, Ghent University, 9000 Gent, Belgium
Interests: wastewater treatment; environmental modelling; water system analysis; climate change; greenhouse gas emissions; decision support tools
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Peter Goethals
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Animal Sciences and Aquatic Ecology, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
Interests: aquatic ecology; monitoring; assessment; ecological modelling; water quality management; ecotechnology; decision support tools; sustainability; ISO standards related to water monitoring and assessment documents via the BELGAQUA and B-IWA organisations
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Freshwater biodiversity has been substantially declining over the past years. Lakes and reservoirs are key freshwater resources that play crucial roles in human societies for drinking water provision, food production (via fisheries, aquaculture, and the irrigation of agricultural lands), recreation, energy provision (hydropower dams), wastewater treatment, and flood and drought control. Consequently, the status of these systems plays a critical role in the human health and social–economic welfare of local communities, and the biodiversity in and around these systems. Not unexpectedly, many sustainable development goals (SDG’s) are linked to these systems, which show how important these systems are for achieving sustainable development in regions that depend on these lakes. Past and recent developments have shown the multi-actor challenges of meeting these diverse objectives by the multi-faceted stakeholders. On the other hand, many opportunities are offered by current and future developments, including new monitoring and assessment methods, as well as growing scientific and social–economic insights stimulating institutions and governments to meet the SDG’s via good governance and policy actions.

This Special Issue invites authors to contribute reviews and research results ranging from innovative monitoring, assessment, and management approaches that can support the optimized and sustainable exploitation of lakes and reservoirs. Papers can handle specific and generic methods (monitoring and assessment techniques) and approaches (models, decision support tools, management actions, policy insights, and governance) that provide insight into the status, design, management, and restoration of lakes and reservoirs. Papers about natural and artificial systems (hydropower reservoirs, wastewater treatment ponds, and aquaculture systems) are welcome as contributions to this Special Issue.

Dr. Long Ho
Prof. Dr. Peter Goethals
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable development goals
  • hydropower reservoirs
  • flood control
  • drought control
  • irrigation
  • drinking water
  • fisheries
  • aquaculture
  • wastewater treatment ponds
  • drinking pools
  • water recreation
  • biodiversity
  • ecological networks
  • ecosystem processes and functions
  • ecosystem services
  • habitat protection and restoration
  • lake and reservoir monitoring
  • nutrient enrichment
  • emerging pollutants
  • water borne diseases
  • assessment methods
  • environmental standards
  • lake and reservoir modelling
  • system dynamics and process control
  • land–river–lake–reservoir interactions
  • cost–benefit analyses
  • multi-stakeholder analyses
  • climate change
  • climate mitigation measures
  • climate adaptation measures
  • management and policy development
  • water governance

Published Papers (16 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Sustainability of Lakes and Reservoirs: Multiple Perspectives Based on Ecosystem Services
Water 2021, 13(19), 2763; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w13192763 - 06 Oct 2021
Viewed by 390
Abstract
This special issue consists of fourteen selected articles, that cover a wide spectrum of Ecosystem Services (ES) of lakes and reservoirs, including: (1) water purification [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)

Research

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Article
Understanding Water Use Conflicts to Advance Collaborative Planning: Lessons Learned from Lake Diefenbaker, Canada
Water 2021, 13(13), 1756; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w13131756 - 25 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 848
Abstract
Conflicts around the multi-purpose water uses of Lake Diefenbaker (LD) in Saskatchewan, Canada need to be addressed to meet rapidly expanding water demands in the arid Canadian prairie region. This study explores these conflicts to advance collaborative planning as a means for improving [...] Read more.
Conflicts around the multi-purpose water uses of Lake Diefenbaker (LD) in Saskatchewan, Canada need to be addressed to meet rapidly expanding water demands in the arid Canadian prairie region. This study explores these conflicts to advance collaborative planning as a means for improving the current water governance and management of this lake. Qualitative methodology that employed a wide participatory approach was used to collect focus group data from 92 individuals, who formed a community of water users. Results indicate that the community of water users is unified in wanting to maintain water quality and quantity, preserving the lake’s aesthetics, and reducing water source vulnerability. Results also show these users are faced with water resource conflicts resulting from lack of coherence of regulatory instruments in the current governance regime, and acceptable management procedures of both consumptive and contemporary water uses that are interlinked in seven areas of: irrigation, industrial, and recreational water uses; reservoir water level for flood control and hydroelectricity production; wastewater and lagoon management; fish farm operations; and regional water development projects. As a means of advancing collaborative planning, improvements in water allocation and regulatory instruments could be made to dissipate consumptive use conflicts and fill the under-regulation void that exists for contemporary water uses. Additionally, a comprehensive LD water use master plan, as a shared vision to improve participation in governance, could be developed to direct the water uses that have emerged over time. This study suggests that these three areas are practical starting conditions that would enable successful collaborative planning for the seven areas of water uses. Focusing on these three areas would ensure the current and future needs of the community of water users are met, while avoiding reactive ways of solving water problems in the LD region, especially as the water crisis in the Canadian Prairie region where LD is located is expected to intensify. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
Transformation of Waste Stabilization Ponds: Reengineering of an Obsolete Sewage Treatment System
Water 2021, 13(9), 1193; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w13091193 - 25 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 616
Abstract
Waste Stabilization Ponds (WSPs) are commonly used for sewage treatment. These systems are composed of a series of ponds: (1) anaerobic ponds, (2) facultative ponds, and (3) maturation ponds. WSPs generally produce good-quality effluent in terms of organic matter and pathogen removal, but [...] Read more.
Waste Stabilization Ponds (WSPs) are commonly used for sewage treatment. These systems are composed of a series of ponds: (1) anaerobic ponds, (2) facultative ponds, and (3) maturation ponds. WSPs generally produce good-quality effluent in terms of organic matter and pathogen removal, but their application has disadvantages. The most serious disadvantages are a long retention time, the release of biogas, and the impossibility of removing nutrients. A promising alternative to the use of WSPs is replacing the anaerobic pond and facultative pond with an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, with the advantages of greatly reducing the retention time and the biogas capture. The post-treatment ponds of the UASB reactor effluent involve oxygen production and the biological consumption of carbon dioxide, which raises the pH. An experimental investigation showed that it is possible to use polishing ponds in a sequential batch regime instead of continuous flow. This modification accelerates the decay of pathogens and accelerates the increase in pH, which, in turn, facilitates the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus. This produces a good-quality effluent with low concentrations of biodegradable organic material, nutrients, and pathogens. This good-quality effluent is obtained in a system without energy consumption or auxiliary materials and with a much smaller area than conventional stabilization ponds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
A Forecast-Skill-Based Dynamic Pre-Storm Level Control for Reservoir Flood-Control Operation
Water 2021, 13(4), 556; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w13040556 - 22 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 670
Abstract
The design and operation of reservoirs based on conventional flood-limited water levels (FLWL) implicitly adopts the assumption of hydrological stationarity. As such, historical-record-based FLWL may not be the best choice for flood-control operations due to the inherent non-stationarity of rainfall inputs. With maturing [...] Read more.
The design and operation of reservoirs based on conventional flood-limited water levels (FLWL) implicitly adopts the assumption of hydrological stationarity. As such, historical-record-based FLWL may not be the best choice for flood-control operations due to the inherent non-stationarity of rainfall inputs. With maturing flood forecasts, this study focuses on establishing linkage between FLWL and skill of forecast, thus developing a “dynamic pre-storm level” approach for reservoir flood-control operations. The approach utilizes forecast flood magnitude, forecast skill and exceedance probability of forecast error to determine the pre-storm reservoir storage for each flood event. The exceedance probability of forecast error for each incoming flood is used as the reservoir flood control standard instead of the probability of a static return interval flood. This approach is demonstrated in a hypothetical situation in the Three Gorges Reservoir in China. The results show that under zero-forecast-skill conditions, the proposed dynamic pre-storm level matches well with the Three Gorges Reservoir-designed FLWL; and, as the forecast accuracy/skill increase, the proposed approach can make better use of the increased forecast accuracy, thereby maximizing floodwater utilization and reservoir storage. In this way, coupling the new approach with FLWL allows for more efficient and economic day-to-day reservoir operations without adding any flood risk. This study validates the usefulness of dynamic water level control during flood season, considering the improvement of flood forecast accuracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
Evaluation of Hydrological Alterations at the Sub-Daily Scale Caused by a Small Hydroelectric Facility
Water 2021, 13(2), 206; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w13020206 - 16 Jan 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 660
Abstract
This work aims to evaluate the hydrologic changes caused by a small hydropower plant on the watercourse in which it is installed. Since hydrologic research with data of temporal frequencies less than a day is less common than daily measurements, there are few [...] Read more.
This work aims to evaluate the hydrologic changes caused by a small hydropower plant on the watercourse in which it is installed. Since hydrologic research with data of temporal frequencies less than a day is less common than daily measurements, there are few indicators and methodologies capable of treating such records. For this reason, 17 indicators are proposed which describe the magnitude, duration, frequency and rate of changes in hydrologic conditions occurring in a watercourse at a sub-daily frequency. These 17 indicators were used to assess changes in the flow regimes at sub-daily scales across the Itiquira hydroelectric facility in Mato Grosso, Brazil. During the dry season the river was more susceptible to hydroelectric operations than during the wet season. Eighty-eight percent of the proposed indicators were significantly altered during the dry season compared to 71% during the rainy season. In addition to the number of indicators that changed between the seasons, the magnitude of the change was different. During the dry season, 53% of the magnitudes of the proposed indicators were classified as having a high magnitude of change, while in the rainy season only 6% of the indicators were characterized as having a high magnitude of change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
Relationships between Temporal and Spatial Changes in Lakes and Climate Change in the Saline-Alkali Concentrated Distribution Area in the Southwest of Songnen Plain, Northeast China, from 1985 to 2015
Water 2020, 12(12), 3557; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w12123557 - 18 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 569
Abstract
The southwest of Songnen Plain, Northeast China, has an arid climate and is a typical concentrated distribution area of saline-alkali soil. The terrain here is low-lying, with many small, shallow lakes that are vulnerable to climate change. This paper used Landsat satellite remote [...] Read more.
The southwest of Songnen Plain, Northeast China, has an arid climate and is a typical concentrated distribution area of saline-alkali soil. The terrain here is low-lying, with many small, shallow lakes that are vulnerable to climate change. This paper used Landsat satellite remote sensing images of this area from 1985 to 2015 to perform interpretation of lake water bodies, to classify the lakes according to their areas, and to analyze the spatial dynamic characteristics of lakes in different areas. During the 30 years from 1985 to 2015, the number of lakes in the study area decreased by 71, and the total lake area decreased by 266.85 km2. The decrease was more serious in the east and northeast, and the appearance and disappearance of lakes was drastic. The Mann–Kendall test method was used to analyze trends in meteorological factors (annual mean temperature, annual precipitation, and annual evaporation) in the study area and perform mutation tests. Through correlation analysis and multiple generalized linear model analysis, the response relationship between lake change and climate change was quantified. The results showed that the average temperature in the area is rising, and the annual precipitation and evaporation are declining. Temperature and precipitation mainly affected lakes of less than 1 km2, with a contribution rate of 31.2% and 39.4%, and evaporation had a certain correlation to the total lake area in the study area, with a contribution rate of 60.2%. Small lakes are susceptible to climatic factors, while large lakes, which are mostly used as water sources, may be influenced more by human factors. This is the problem and challenge to be uncovered in this article. This research will help to improve our understanding of lake evolution and climate change response in saline-alkali areas and provide scientific basis for research into lakes’ (reservoirs’) sustainable development and protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
Water Use Conflict and Coordination between Agricultural and Wetlands—A Case Study of Yanqi Basin
Water 2020, 12(11), 3225; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w12113225 - 18 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 838
Abstract
Increased groundwater extraction leads to the decrease of the extent of wetlands due to the implementation of a water-saving transformation project in an arid irrigation area. The application of integrated mitigation tools and strategies in China have increasing significance. In this study, an [...] Read more.
Increased groundwater extraction leads to the decrease of the extent of wetlands due to the implementation of a water-saving transformation project in an arid irrigation area. The application of integrated mitigation tools and strategies in China have increasing significance. In this study, an integrated approach (SWAT-MODFLOW) was followed; it is based on a soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) coupled with a modular three-dimensional finite difference groundwater model (MODFLOW). Recharge and evaporation values were estimated by SWAT and were then used to simulate groundwater in a MODFLOW model. Calibration (over the years 2000–2010) and validation (over the years 2010–2016) were performed, based on observed groundwater-level data; results showed that the combined SWAT-MODFLOW provides more accurate simulation and prediction of the dynamic changes of surface water and groundwater in irrigation areas than results from individual MODFLOW models. This method was applied to the Yanqi Basin, which is one of the most appropriate arid agricultural basins for modeling lake wetland and groundwater in China. The correlation coefficients (R2) between the simulated and real groundwater level are 0.96 and 0.91 in SWAT-MODFLOW and MODFLOW, respectively. With the gradual increase in the extraction to 248%, 0.62 × 108 m3 of groundwater discharged into the lake became −2.25 × 108 m3. The lake level drops 1.3 m compared with the current year, when the groundwater exploitation increases by 10 × 108 m3/year. Overall, the results of the coupling model offer scientific evidence for agricultural water management and lake recovery, so as to enhance the water use coordination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
Modelling Water Quality Improvements in a South Korean Inter-Basin Water Transfer System
Water 2020, 12(11), 3173; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w12113173 - 13 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 512
Abstract
In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using constructed wetlands for non-point source pollution reduction. The effect of constructed wetlands in reducing suspended solids (SS) was analyzed using an integrated modeling system of watershed model (HSPF), reservoir model (CE-QUAL-W2), and stream model [...] Read more.
In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using constructed wetlands for non-point source pollution reduction. The effect of constructed wetlands in reducing suspended solids (SS) was analyzed using an integrated modeling system of watershed model (HSPF), reservoir model (CE-QUAL-W2), and stream model (EFDC) to investigate the behavior and accumulation of the pollution sources based on 2017 water quality data. The constructed wetlands significantly reduced the SS concentration by approximately 30%, and the other in-lake management practices (e.g., artificial floating islands and sedimentation basins) contributed an additional decrease of approximately 7%. Selective withdrawal decreased in the average SS concentration in the influents by ~10%; however, the effluents passing through the constructed wetlands showed only a slight difference of 1.9% in the average SS concentration. In order to meet the water quality standards, it was necessary to combine the constructed wetlands, in-lake water quality management, and selective withdrawal practices. Hence, it was determined that the model proposed herein is useful for estimating the quantitative effects of water quality management practices such as constructed wetlands, which provided practical guidelines for the application of further water quality management policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
Artificial Floating Island with Vetiver for Treatment of Arsenic-Contaminated Water: A Real Scale Study in High-Andean Reservoir
Water 2020, 12(11), 3086; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w12113086 - 04 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1439
Abstract
Arsenic found in agriculture water reservoirs represents a threat to water security and safe agricultural products in developing countries. Small farms do not implement traditional water treatments due to the high cost; hence, a nature-based solution is an alternative to tackling this challenge. [...] Read more.
Arsenic found in agriculture water reservoirs represents a threat to water security and safe agricultural products in developing countries. Small farms do not implement traditional water treatments due to the high cost; hence, a nature-based solution is an alternative to tackling this challenge. This paper investigated the potential of artificial floating island with Vetiver (AFIV) for the geogenic arsenic removal present in the reservoir of the Ilinizas páramo in Ecuador. We constructed two AFIV systems using PVC pipes in a reservoir batch type with a 3.6 m3 treatment capacity. Arsenic and iron were analyzed in duplicated every 30 days at the affluent and effluent through 120 days. The average remediation of arsenic was recorded as 97% in water and 84% in sediment, while the average remediation of iron was 87% in sediment. The survival rate of macrophytes was 92%; they accumulated arsenic in its roots that acted as a barrier against the translocation. The research demonstrated that the use of AFIV has the potential to rehabilitate reservoirs contaminated with arsenic under adverse climatic conditions such as the páramo ecosystem. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
The Water-Saving Strategies Assessment (WSSA) Framework: An Application for the Urmia Lake Restoration Program
Water 2020, 12(10), 2789; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w12102789 - 08 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1071
Abstract
Increases in water demand often result in unsustainable water use, leaving insufficient amounts of water for the environment. Therefore, water-saving strategies have been introduced to the environmental policy agenda in many (semi)-arid regions. As many such interventions failed to reach their objectives, a [...] Read more.
Increases in water demand often result in unsustainable water use, leaving insufficient amounts of water for the environment. Therefore, water-saving strategies have been introduced to the environmental policy agenda in many (semi)-arid regions. As many such interventions failed to reach their objectives, a comprehensive tool is needed to assess them. We introduced a constructive framework to assess the proposed strategies by estimating five key components of the water balance in an area: (1) Demand; (2) Availability; (3) Withdrawal; (4) Depletion and (5) Outflow. The framework was applied to assess the Urmia Lake Restoration Program (ULRP) which aimed to increase the basin outflow to the lake to reach 3.1 × 109 m3 yr−1. Results suggested that ULRP could help to increase the Outflow by up to 57%. However, successful implementation of the ULRP was foreseen to be impeded because of three main reasons: (i) decreasing return flows; (ii) increased Depletion; (iii) the impact of climate change. Decreasing return flows and increasing Depletion were expected due to the introduction of technologies that increase irrigation efficiency, while climate change could decrease future water availability by an estimated 3–15%. We suggest that to reach the intervention target, strategies need to focus on reducing water depletion rather than water withdrawals. The framework can be used to comprehensively assess water-saving strategies, particularly in water-stressed basins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
Generalised Linear Models for Prediction of Dissolved Oxygen in a Waste Stabilisation Pond
Water 2020, 12(7), 1930; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w12071930 - 07 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 781
Abstract
Due to simplicity and low costs, waste stabilisation ponds (WSPs) have become one of the most popular biological wastewater treatment systems that are applied in many places around the globe. Increasingly, pond modelling has become an interesting tool to improve and optimise their [...] Read more.
Due to simplicity and low costs, waste stabilisation ponds (WSPs) have become one of the most popular biological wastewater treatment systems that are applied in many places around the globe. Increasingly, pond modelling has become an interesting tool to improve and optimise their performance. Unlike process-driven models, generalised linear models (GLMs) can deliver considerable practical values in specific case studies with limited resources of time, data and mechanistic understanding, especially in the case of pond systems containing vast complexity of many unknown processes. This study aimed to investigate the key driving factors of dissolved oxygen variability in Ucubamba WSP (Ecuador), by applying and comparing numerous GLMs. Particularly, using different data partitioning and cross-validation strategies, we compared the predictive accuracy of 83 GLMs. The obtained results showed that chlorophyll a had a strong impact on the dissolved oxygen (DO) level near the water surface, while organic matter could be the most influential factor on the DO variability at the bottom of the pond. Among the 83 models, the optimal models were pond- and depth-specific. Specifically, among the ponds, the models of MPs predicted DO more precisely than those of facultative ponds; while within a pond, the models of the surface performed better than those of the bottom. Using mean absolute error (MAE) and symmetric mean absolute percentage error (SMAPE) to represent model predictive performance, it was found that MAEs varied in the range of 0.22–2.75 mg L−1 in the training period and 0.74–3.54 mg L−1 in the validation period; while SMAPEs were in the range of 2.35–38.70% in the training period and 10.88–71.62% in the validation period. By providing insights into the oxygen-related processes, the findings could be valuable for future pond operation and monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
The Identification of Factors Determining the Probability of Practicing Inland Water Tourism Through Logistic Regression Models: The Case of Extremadura, Spain
Water 2020, 12(6), 1664; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w12061664 - 10 Jun 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 852
Abstract
Inland water tourism is put forward as a highly sustainable and attractive tourism product owing to its ability to generate economic development, raise awareness of respect for the environment, and contribute towards the diversification necessary to alleviate overexposure in coastal areas. For this [...] Read more.
Inland water tourism is put forward as a highly sustainable and attractive tourism product owing to its ability to generate economic development, raise awareness of respect for the environment, and contribute towards the diversification necessary to alleviate overexposure in coastal areas. For this reason, territories with sufficient expanses of water increasingly strive to create tourist products which allow them to enjoy the benefits associated with this type of tourism. The case of the region of Extremadura in Spain deserves special attention due to the abundant presence of lake resources which allows it to find an opportunity to stand out in inland water tourism and promote economic development. The initial objective of this research is the generation of knowledge of the demand currently existing in the territory. In order to do so, a logit regression model is used based on 4625 surveys collected in 2017. This model is later verified by means of a Chow test so as to analyze which factors influence the probability of practicing inland water tourism, paying attention to certain control variables such as the season or the tourist market. The results obtained have important implications for tourism managers and the establishment of a suitable development policy strategy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
The Endemic Species Flock of Labeobarbus spp. in L. Tana (Ethiopia) Threatened by Extinction: Implications for Conservation Management
Water 2019, 11(12), 2560; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w11122560 - 04 Dec 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1098
Abstract
The endemic Labeobarbus species in Lake Tana are severely affected by anthropogenic pressures. The implementation of fisheries management is, therefore, vital for their sustainable exploitation. This study aimed at investigating the catch distribution and size at 50% maturity (FL50%) of the [...] Read more.
The endemic Labeobarbus species in Lake Tana are severely affected by anthropogenic pressures. The implementation of fisheries management is, therefore, vital for their sustainable exploitation. This study aimed at investigating the catch distribution and size at 50% maturity (FL50%) of the Labeobarbus species. Samples were collected monthly from May 2016 to April 2017 at four sites. The relative abundance, catch per unit effort (CPUE), and size distribution of these species was computed, and logistic regression was used to calculate FL50%. Of the 15 species observed, five species constituted 88% of the total catch. The monthly catch of the Labeobarbus spp. declined by more than 85% since 1993 and by 76% since 2001. Moreover, the CPUE of Labeobarbus has markedly decreased from 63 kg/trip in 1991–1993 to 2 kg/trip in 2016–2017. Additionally, large size specimens (≥30 cm fork length) were rarely recorded, and FL50% of the dominant species decreased. This suggests that the unique species flock may be threatened by extinction. Given the size distribution of the species, the current social context, and the need for a continuous supply of fish for low-income communities, a mesh-size limitation represents a more sustainable and acceptable management measure than a closed season. This paper illustrates the tension between sustainable development goal (SDGs) 1—No Poverty, 2—Zero Hunger, and 8—Decent Work and Economic Growth in Bahir Dar City on the one hand, and SDG’s 11—Sustainable Cities and Communities, 12—Responsible Consumption and Production, and 14—Life Below Water on the other hand. A key for the local, sustainable development of the fisheries is to find a balance between the fishing activities and the carrying capacity of the Lake Tana. Overfishing and illegal fishing are some of the major threats in this respect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Article
Estimation of Reservoir Sediment Flux through Bottom Outlet with Combination of Numerical and Empirical Methods
Water 2019, 11(7), 1353; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w11071353 - 29 Jun 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1278
Abstract
Sediment deposition issues for reservoirs are important in Taiwan because the severe deposition could excessively decrease the reservoir lifecycle. Extreme storm events usually can carry a massive amount of sediment into reservoirs, and deposition will happen unless the incoming material can pass through [...] Read more.
Sediment deposition issues for reservoirs are important in Taiwan because the severe deposition could excessively decrease the reservoir lifecycle. Extreme storm events usually can carry a massive amount of sediment into reservoirs, and deposition will happen unless the incoming material can pass through sluice gates. When it comes with high concentration, the density current flow is prone to be generated, and the bottom outlets are the most effective sluice gate to release the sediment. In order to improve the sediment release efficiency, an accurate estimation of arriving concentration and time of the density current can be useful for the reservoir management. This study develops a two-stage approach which combines a numerical model (SRH2D) and the modified Rouse equation to predict the sediment flux of the reservoir. The numerical model was verified and applied to establish the relation between inflow and dam face concentration. The modified Rouse equation then adopted this relation to estimate the proper exponential parameter. As a result, the sediment flux amount at each bottom outlet can be accurately predicted by this equation. With this means, an early warning system can be established for reservoir operation, which can improve release efficiency during typhoons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Review

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Review
Opportunities and Challenges for the Sustainability of Lakes and Reservoirs in Relation to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
Water 2019, 11(7), 1462; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w11071462 - 15 Jul 2019
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 7437 | Correction
Abstract
Emerging global threats, such as biological invasions, climate change, land use intensification, and water depletion, endanger the sustainable future of lakes and reservoirs. To deal with these threats, a multidimensional view on the protection and exploitation of lakes and reservoirs is needed. The [...] Read more.
Emerging global threats, such as biological invasions, climate change, land use intensification, and water depletion, endanger the sustainable future of lakes and reservoirs. To deal with these threats, a multidimensional view on the protection and exploitation of lakes and reservoirs is needed. The holistic approach needs to contain not just the development of economy and society but also take into account the negative impacts of this growth on the environment, from that, the balance between the three dimensions can be sustained to reach a sustainable future. As such, this paper provides a comprehensive review on future opportunities and challenges for the sustainable development of lakes and reservoirs via a critical analysis on their contribution to individual and subsets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Currently, lakes and reservoirs are key freshwater resources. They play crucial roles in human societies for drinking water provision, food production (via fisheries, aquaculture, and the irrigation of agricultural lands), recreation, energy provision (via hydropower dams), wastewater treatment, and flood and drought control. Because of the (mostly) recent intensive exploitations, many lakes and reservoirs are severely deteriorated. In recent years, physical (habitat) degradation has become very important while eutrophication remains the main issue for many lakes and ponds worldwide. Besides constant threats from anthropogenic activities, such as urbanization, industry, aquaculture, and watercourse alterations, climate change and emerging contaminants, such as microplastics and antimicrobial resistance, can generate a global problem for the sustainability of lakes and reservoirs. In relation to the SDGs, the actions for achieving the sustainability of lakes and reservoirs have positive links with the SDGs related to environmental dimensions (Goals 6, 13, 14, and 15) as they are mutually reinforcing each other. On the other hand, these actions have direct potential conflicts with the SDGs related to social and economic dimensions (Goals 1, 2, 3 and 8). From these interlinkages, we propose 22 indicators that can be used by decision makers for monitoring and assessing the sustainable development of lakes and reservoirs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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Correction
Correction: Ho, L.T.; Goethals, P.L.M. Opportunities and Challenges for the Sustainability of Lakes and Reservoirs in Relation to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Water 2019, 11, 1462
Water 2021, 13(22), 3207; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/w13223207 - 12 Nov 2021
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Abstract
In the original article [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Development of Lakes and Reservoirs)
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