Special Issue "Feature Papers in Women 2021"

A special issue of Women (ISSN 2673-4184).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2021) | Viewed by 8761

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mary V. Seeman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
Interests: schizophrenia; women's mental health; antipsychotic medication
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

As the Editor-in-Chief of Women, I am delighted to present this Special Issue of “Feature Papers in Women” in the newly launched Women journal. Women is a new, international, open access, and peer-reviewed journal. The publication focuses on the physical, mental, and emotional health of women.

This Special Issue of Women will comprise a collection of high-quality papers published free of charge in open access form by Editorial Board Members and authors personally invited by the Editorial Office and the Editor-in-Chief. Both original research articles and comprehensive review papers are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Mary V. Seeman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Women is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Health behaviours
  • Health determinants
  • Health service and health policy research
  • Mental health
  • Physical health
  • Public health and epidemiology

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Influence of Menstrual Cycle Length and Age at Menarche on Symptoms, Cognition, Social Cognition, and Metacognition in Patients with First-Episode Psychosis
Women 2022, 2(2), 135-146; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women2020015 - 02 Jun 2022
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Abstract
A protective effect has traditionally been attributed to estrogen in psychotic disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate cumulative lifetime estrogen by assessing the menstrual cycle length, age at menarche, and years of difference between the onset of psychotic symptoms and [...] Read more.
A protective effect has traditionally been attributed to estrogen in psychotic disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate cumulative lifetime estrogen by assessing the menstrual cycle length, age at menarche, and years of difference between the onset of psychotic symptoms and the age of menarche, measuring their effects on symptoms, cognition, social cognition, and metacognition. As it was not possible to directly measure cumulative estrogen levels over the lifetime of a patient, the study sample was composed of 42 women with first-episode psychosis; estrogen levels were inferred by the menstrual cycle length, age at menarche, and years of difference between the onset of psychotic symptoms and menarche. All patients were assessed with a battery of questionnaires using the BDI, PSYRATS, PANSS, STROOP, TAVEC, WSCT, IPSAQ, and BCIS questionnaires. The results related to menstrual cycle length showed a relationship with memory; specifically, shorter cycles with semantic strategies (p = 0.046) and longer cycles with serial strategies in the short term (p = 0.005) as well as in the long term (p = 0.031). The results also showed a relationship with perseverative errors (p = 0.035) and self-certainty (p = 0.049). Only personalized bias (p = 0.030) was found to be significant in relation to the age at menarche. When analyzing the differences in years of difference between the age at menarche and the onset of psychotic symptoms, the results indicated lower scores in women with a smaller difference between both events in memory (short-term (p = 0.050), long-term (p = 0.024), intrusions (p = 0.013), and recognition (p = 0.043)) and non-perseverative errors (p = 0.024). No relationship was found between symptoms and menstrual characteristics. The investigatory outcomes seem to indicate a relationship between estrogen cumulative effects and the memory domain. More in-depth investigations in the field are necessary in order to improve personalized treatment in women with psychosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Women 2021)
Article
Are There Gender Differences in Social Cognition in First-Episode Psychosis?
Women 2021, 1(4), 204-211; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women1040018 - 20 Oct 2021
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore gender differences in social cognition in a sample of first-episode psychosis (FEP). An observational descriptive study was performed with 191 individuals with FEP. Emotion perception was assessed using the Faces Test, theory of mind was [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to explore gender differences in social cognition in a sample of first-episode psychosis (FEP). An observational descriptive study was performed with 191 individuals with FEP. Emotion perception was assessed using the Faces Test, theory of mind was assessed using the Hinting Task, and attributional style was assessed using the Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire. No gender differences were found in any of the social cognitive domains. Our results suggest that men and women with FEP achieve similar performances in social cognition. Therefore, targeting specific needs in social cognition regarding gender may not be required in early interventions for psychosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Women 2021)
Article
Perception of and Motivation for Physical Activity among Women with a History of Gestational Diabetes
Women 2021, 1(2), 109-119; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women1020010 - 02 Jun 2021
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Abstract
(1) Background: Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). This risk can be reduced with lifestyle interventions, including physical activity. However, studies have shown that many women with prior GDM are [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). This risk can be reduced with lifestyle interventions, including physical activity. However, studies have shown that many women with prior GDM are not physically active. The aim of this study was to investigate the motivation for physical activity among women with prior GDM. (2) Methods: A qualitative study was carried out based on a phenomenological approach using semi-structured individual interviews with nine Danish women between 29 and 36 years of age with a minimum of one earlier GDM-affected pregnancy. (3) Results: Five themes were identified; perception of physical activity, risk perception, emotional distress, competing priorities and social support. The perception of physical activity varied among the women. The GDM diagnosis or the awareness of elevated risk for T2DM did not seem to be a decisive factor for the women’s motivation to be active. Competing priorities, including being in control of everyday life choices and support from social relations, were found to be important motivational factors. (4) Conclusion: Future interventions for women with prior GDM to increase motivation for physical activity should be compatible with and take into account the women’s perceptions, earlier lived experiences, possible competing priorities and support systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Women 2021)

Review

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Review
Gynecological Health Concerns in Women with Schizophrenia and Related Disorders: A Narrative Review of Recent Studies
Women 2022, 2(1), 1-14; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women2010001 - 04 Jan 2022
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Abstract
Sex and age are important factors influencing physical and mental health in schizophrenia. Our goal was to review the recent literature for associations between gynecological conditions and psychotic illness and to propose integrated strategies for their management in order to improve overall health [...] Read more.
Sex and age are important factors influencing physical and mental health in schizophrenia. Our goal was to review the recent literature for associations between gynecological conditions and psychotic illness and to propose integrated strategies for their management in order to improve overall health outcomes in women. We addressed the following questions: What are the prevalence and risk factors of gynecological disorders in women with schizophrenia or delusional disorder (DD)? What are the rates of uptake of gynecological cancer screening and mortality in this population? What role does menopause play? We found an increased incidence of breast cancer in women with schizophrenia. Other gynecological comorbidities were less frequent, but the field has been understudied. Low rates of breast and cervical cancer screening characterize women with schizophrenia. Menopause, because of endocrine changes, aging effects, and resultant comorbidity is associated with high rates of aggressive breast cancer in this population. Uterine and ovarian cancers have been less investigated. Psychosocial determinants of health play an important role in cancer survival. The findings lead to the recommendation that primary care, psychiatry, gynecology, oncology, and endocrinology collaborate in early case finding, in research into etiological links, and in improvement of prevention and treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Women 2021)
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Other

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Commentary
Racial Discrimination against Minority Healthcare Workers in Women’s Health
Women 2022, 2(2), 88-92; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women2020010 - 22 Mar 2022
Viewed by 813
Abstract
The women’s sexual and reproductive healthcare sector, one of the largest employers delivering services globally, does not always commit to equality, diversity, and inclusion. There is objective, published evidence that not only care provision but also workforce treatment permits inequality and discrimination. The [...] Read more.
The women’s sexual and reproductive healthcare sector, one of the largest employers delivering services globally, does not always commit to equality, diversity, and inclusion. There is objective, published evidence that not only care provision but also workforce treatment permits inequality and discrimination. The black and ethnic minority workforce in the women’s health specialty, compared to their white counterparts, is often treated unfavorably in appointments, is less often afforded academic development opportunities, is, at many sites, subjected to disproportionately greater disciplinary penalties, tends not have representation in positions of authority, and undertakes training in what is often perceived as a climate of fear due to racism. This problem deserves immediate action by professional bodies. They have the responsibility to remove feelings of exclusion and lack of belonging to all staff, the negative impact on wellbeing caused by unnecessary stress, and concerns over career progression among minority ethnic healthcare workforce and other workers who report discrimination. This duty is part of the societal responsibility to ensure fairness and eradicate discrimination under the equality, diversity and inclusion agenda. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Women 2021)
Commentary
Understanding Vulnerability in Girls and Young Women with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder
Women 2022, 2(1), 64-67; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women2010007 - 27 Feb 2022
Viewed by 3688
Abstract
There is a population of young women with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who function relatively well so that their disorder is not easily recognized. If their difficulties with emotion regulation in childhood continue into adolescence they are vulnerable to the development of a [...] Read more.
There is a population of young women with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who function relatively well so that their disorder is not easily recognized. If their difficulties with emotion regulation in childhood continue into adolescence they are vulnerable to the development of a number of mental disorders, treatment of which can be difficult if the presence of ASD is not understood. In this commentary, I use the example of gender dysphoria to illustrate the issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Women 2021)
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