Topic Editors

Departament of Functional Biology Genetic Area, University of Oviedo, C/Julián Clavería s/n, 33006 Oviedo-Asturias, Spain
Dr. Sara Fernandez Fernandez
Departament of Functional Biology Genetic Area, University of Oviedo, C/Julián Clavería s/n, 33006 Oviedo-Asturias, Spain

Coastal Macro-, Meso-, and Microplastic Pollution: Effects on the Health of Humans and Ecosystems

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 March 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (30 May 2024)
Viewed by
4546

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plastic pollution is a major environmental issue that affects coasts across the globe. Since 1950, global plastic production has increased from 5 to 250 million tons per year, and 1/3 of this production is derived from disposable single-use plastics. Plastic fragments are classified by size, into microplastics (<5 mm), mesoplastics (5–20 mm), and macroplastics (>20 mm), and depending on their size, they can harm marine species in different ways. Marine plastic debris stems from both terrestrial and maritime sources, and coastal ecosystems, being in the interface between the two, are the point of first entry for ocean pollutants, usually via pipeline discharges, disposal from vessels, riverine input, atmospheric deposition, and nonpoint source runoff from land. Their effects can be detected at different levels: including acting as a vector of invasive species; negative socio-economic impacts, at both industrial (shipping and aquaculture) and touristic (yachting and tourism) levels; and affecting a wide range of marine organisms, including invertebrates and many species consumed as seafood.

Their economic importance for fishing and tourism, as well as the damage caused to them by human activity, make coastal ecosystems a priority when it comes to analysing the effects of plastic pollution on the health of both the ecosystems themselves and humans around them.

Original works, reviews, and short communications are all very welcome.

Dr. Alba Ardura Gutiérrez
Dr. Sara Fernandez Fernandez
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • plastic pollution
  • microplastics
  • mesoplastics
  • macroplastics
  • marine species
  • invertebrates
  • seafood
  • coastal ecosystem
  • human activity

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Diversity
diversity
2.4 3.4 2009 17.8 Days CHF 2600
Environments
environments
3.7 5.7 2014 23.7 Days CHF 1800
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering
jmse
2.9 4.4 2013 15.4 Days CHF 2600
Toxics
toxics
4.6 4.5 2013 14.7 Days CHF 2600
Water
water
3.4 5.8 2009 16.5 Days CHF 2600

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 3936 KiB  
Article
Distribution and Environmental Impact of Expanded Polystyrene Buoys from Korean Aquaculture Farms
by Seongbong Seo and Young-Gyu Park
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(2), 256; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jmse12020256 - 31 Jan 2024
Viewed by 786
Abstract
Expanded polystyrene (EPS) buoys, commonly employed in South Korean aquaculture farms, are prone to fragmentation, generating substantial marine debris. The trajectories of EPS buoys dislocated from aquaculture farms were investigated using a Lagrangian particle-tracking model. Daily ocean current data from the 1/12° Hybrid [...] Read more.
Expanded polystyrene (EPS) buoys, commonly employed in South Korean aquaculture farms, are prone to fragmentation, generating substantial marine debris. The trajectories of EPS buoys dislocated from aquaculture farms were investigated using a Lagrangian particle-tracking model. Daily ocean current data from the 1/12° Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model analysis and wind data from the 1/4° European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts reanalysis were used as inputs. The particles were released daily, and the initial positions and number of particles were determined based on the usage of EPS buoys. Because EPS buoys are highly buoyant, both wind and ocean currents considerably influence their movement. To account for variations in the buoyancy of these buoys, three experiments were conducted, each considering different levels of windage. The simulation results closely aligned with the observed coastal distribution patterns of the large EPS debris. As the windage increases, the particles exhibit a swifter deviation from their original locations, highlighting the need for effective local management. Moreover, this increased windage affects the distribution patterns in regional seas, reducing the number of particles that flow into the East Sea, while increasing the number of particles that migrate into the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Full article
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15 pages, 2278 KiB  
Article
Microplastics Risk into a Three-Link Food Chain Inside European Hake
by Paula Cabanilles, Susana Acle, Andrés Arias, Paula Masiá, Alba Ardura and Eva Garcia-Vazquez
Diversity 2022, 14(5), 308; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/d14050308 - 19 Apr 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2572
Abstract
Microplastics (MPs) are increasing in the marine environment as well as inside marine organisms, having an important effect on biological diversity. The trophic transfer of MPs was demonstrated under laboratory conditions, but this study is based on the analysis of preys found in [...] Read more.
Microplastics (MPs) are increasing in the marine environment as well as inside marine organisms, having an important effect on biological diversity. The trophic transfer of MPs was demonstrated under laboratory conditions, but this study is based on the analysis of preys found in stomach contents. MPs from Merluccius merluccius individuals caught in the Cantabrian Sea and preys inside their guts (blue whiting, and northern krill inside blue whiting) were analyzed. MPs with different chemical composition occurred inside every hake and their preys, with different damages, from aquatic life hazards with long lasting effects, to allergic skin reactions and respiratory irritation, not only for aquatic species and fishing resources, but also for humans through hake consumption. The similarity of MPs profiles from gills and seawater samples would support seawater as the main source of gill microplastics. The MPs profile of hake GIT was similar to that of hake preys inside. Despite the small sample size, the presence of MPs in all the tissues analyzed of hakes and their preys, together with the evidence of hazard compositions of some of them, highlights the need for policies and actions to reduce plastic and microplastic production and consumption. Full article
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