Bioengineering Tools Applied to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

Dear Colleagues,

Oral and maxillofacial surgery is dedicated to the surgical treatment of pathological conditions that affect the mouth, jaw and face. The oro-facial and maxillofacial deformities constitute a large group of anomalies that have in common the existence of alterations in the shape, position and size of the distinct musculoskeletal elements of the face. These deformities can be congenital, appear and worsen during development, or be secondary to trauma, cancer or tooth loss. In many cases, the alterations of the facial skeleton: upper jaw and mandible can cause alterations of the dental occlusion, so it is often the dentist or orthodontist who identifies the pathology first and should refer it to the maxillofacial surgeon.

Compared to traditional methods, the ultimate goal of modern digital technologies is to improve the quality and possibilities of intervention in carrying out patient assessment, diagnosis and treatment. Today in dentistry, there is a real digital revolution.

Thanks to digital technology, important results can be offered to patients who can pass from extraction to a functional and aesthetic temporary prosthesis that is similar to the final result within a day. In the near future, new materials, such as high-strength polymers, are on the way.

Prof. Dr. Gabriele Cervino
Prof. Dr. Alberto Bianchi
Dr. Pietro Felice
Topic Editors

Deadline for abstract submissions: 31 December 2021.
Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Topic Board

Prof. Dr. Gabriele Cervino
E-Mail Website
Topic Editor-in-Chief
Prof. Dr. Alberto Bianchi
E-Mail Website
Topic Associate Editor-in-Chief
Department of General Surgery and Medical-Surgery Specialities, University of Catania, 95100 Catania CT, Italy
Interests: oral surgery; maxillofacial surgery; rehabilitation; biomaterials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Pietro Felice
E-Mail Website
Topic Associate Editor-in-Chief
Unit of Odontostomatologic Surgery, Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy
Interests: dental implants; reconstructive surgeries; minimal invasiveness; native bone; surgical technologies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • oral surgery
  • implantology
  • oral pathology
  • prosthodontics
  • bioengineering, surgery, maxillofacial

Relevant Journals List

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Applied Sciences
applsci
2.679 3.0 2011 13.8 Days 2000 CHF Submit
Dentistry Journal
dentistry
- 2.2 2013 17.49 Days 1400 CHF Submit
Osteology
osteology
- - 2021 33.22 Days 1000 CHF Submit

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Non-Toxic Anesthesia for Cataract Surgery
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(21), 10269; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app112110269 - 01 Nov 2021
Abstract
Background: To study the safety and efficacy provided by a minimal and localized anesthesia in cataract surgery. Methods: Randomized controlled trial. A total of 100 patients undergoing cataract surgery were randomly divided into two groups of 50, which respecitvely received conventional topical anesthesia [...] Read more.
Background: To study the safety and efficacy provided by a minimal and localized anesthesia in cataract surgery. Methods: Randomized controlled trial. A total of 100 patients undergoing cataract surgery were randomly divided into two groups of 50, which respecitvely received conventional topical anesthesia consisting of preservative-free Oxibuprocaine hydrochloride 0.4% drops or minimal localized anesthesia, administered with a cotton bud soaked in preservative-free Oxibuprocaine hydrochloride 0.4% applied to clear cornea on the access sites for 10 s immediately before surgery. The mean outcome measures were intraoperative pain and the incidence of postoperative ocular discomfort. Results: All patients tolerated well the procedure, giving patin scores between 1–3. Fifteen patients (30%) of group 1 and ten of group 2 (25%) required supplemental anesthesia. No intraoperative complications were recorded. No eyes had epithelial defects at the end of the surgery or at postoperative check-ups. Conclusions: Minimal anesthesia in cataract surgery resulted quick, safe and non-invasive. Full article
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Article
Determination of the Vertical Dimension and the Position of the Occlusal Plane in a Removable Prosthesis Using Cephalometric Analysis and Golden Proportion
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(15), 6948; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11156948 - 28 Jul 2021
Abstract
The aim of this study is to demonstrate the use and the effectiveness of cephalometry and golden proportions analysis of the face in planning prosthetic treatments in totally edentulous patients. In order to apply this method, latero-lateral and posterior-anterior X-rays must be performed [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to demonstrate the use and the effectiveness of cephalometry and golden proportions analysis of the face in planning prosthetic treatments in totally edentulous patients. In order to apply this method, latero-lateral and posterior-anterior X-rays must be performed in addition to the common procedure. Two main concerns for totally edentulous patients are the establishment of the vertical dimension and the new position of the occlusal plane. The divine proportion analysis was carried out by the use of a golden divider. The prosthetic protocol was divided into three steps and a case was selected for better understanding. Referring to the golden relations, if the distance from the chin to the wing of the nose is 1.0, the distance from the nose to eye is 0.618. This proportion is useful and effective in determining the correct prosthetic vertical dimension. The incisal margin of the lower incisor must be positioned between Point A (A) and protuberance menti (Pm) according to the gold ratio 0.618 of the total height A-Pm. Posteriorly the occlusal plane must be placed 2 mm below the divine occlusal plane (traced from the incisal margin of lower incisors to Xi point). A prosthesis made in accordance with cephalometric parameters and divine proportions of the face helps to improve the patient’s aesthetics, function and social personality. Full article
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