Metal Coordination Complexes in Biological Systems

Dear Colleagues,

Metal complexes and inorganic salts are used for medicinal purposes since ancient times. Antimony was used by Assyrians for urinary tract afflictions. Antimony compounds were used in Europe from the Middle Ages until the nineteenth century as laxatives and “humor cleansers.” Today, antimony salts are employed against schistosomiasis and leishmaniasis. Other metal compounds currently used in medicine include gold(I) complexes such as aurothiomalate (Myocrisin), aurothioglucose (Solganol), aurothiopropanol sulfonate (Allochrysin), and the oral drug auranofin (Ridaura) for the treatment of difficult cases of rheumatoid arthritis (37), bismuth subcitrate, and subsalicylate are for the treatment of diarrhea, dyspepsia and gastric ulcers, and the world-famous cisplatin for cancer chemotherapy.

Metal complexes are less abundant medicines than the purely organic small molecules, mainly due to the difficulty in establishing high-throughput screening and synthesis methods for their preparation and evaluation, in addition to the higher cost of production of molecules incorporating one or more metal atoms. Nevertheless, metal complexes have been continuously and increasingly investigated as promising sources of innovative drugs for challenging pathologies such as cancer, metabolic diseases, microbial infection, and neglected tropical diseases.

The topic “Metal Coordination Complexes in Medicine” welcomes contributions that describe interesting advances in the field or identify new targets for metals in biological systems. The submitted papers can encompass both research articles and critical reviews, the latter of which is expected to direct readers to new avenues of research in metal drug development.

Dr. Susana Santos Braga
Dr. Filipe Alexandre Almeida Paz
Topic Editors

Deadline for abstract submissions: 31 December 2021.
Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Topic Board

Dr. Susana Santos Braga
E-Mail Website
Topic Editor-in-Chief
Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: solid-solid reactions by mechanochemistry; cyclodextrin inclusion compounds; solubilisation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs); local therapeutic systems for osteosarcoma and osteoporosis; antioxidant flavonoids and their Ru(II) complexes; natural and metallo-organic compounds for cytotoxic and biocidal activities; innovative medicines for leishmaniasis based on inorganic complexes and cyclodextrins
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Filipe Alexandre Almeida Paz
E-Mail Website
Topic Associate Editor-in-Chief
Department of Chemistry, CICECO−Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: design of functional metal-organic frameworks; catalysis; photoluminescence; proton conductivity; new synthetic methods of MOFs; sensing; interconvertible MOFs; sustainable synthesis methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Keywords

  • metal antitumorals
  • metal-based biocides
  • antiparasitic agents
  • oligoelements
  • metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)
  • BioMOFs

Relevant Journals List

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Applied Sciences
applsci
2.679 3.0 2011 13.8 Days 2000 CHF Submit
Bioengineering
bioengineering
- 6.1 2014 18.84 Days 1600 CHF Submit

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Article
Synthesis, Spectroscopic Characterization and Biological Studies of Mn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) Complexes with New Schiff Base of 2-((Pyrazine-2-ylimino)methyl)phenol
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(19), 9067; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/app11199067 - 29 Sep 2021
Abstract
In the search for novel anticancer complex, transition metal complexes of Schiff base derived from 2-aminopyrazine and salicylaldehyde were successfully synthesized and characterized based on elemental analyses, spectroscopic and thermal analysis. The IR spectra showed the ligand is a tridentate chelator with O, [...] Read more.
In the search for novel anticancer complex, transition metal complexes of Schiff base derived from 2-aminopyrazine and salicylaldehyde were successfully synthesized and characterized based on elemental analyses, spectroscopic and thermal analysis. The IR spectra showed the ligand is a tridentate chelator with O, N and N atoms. donor sites in the Zn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Mn(II) complexes. Contrary, it behaved a bidentate chelator in the Cu complex by O and N. Molar ratio data revealed that the ligand to metal ratio was 1:2 for Co(II) Cu(II) and Zn(II) while it was 1:1 for Mn(II) and Ni(II) complexes. The obtained complexes have the formulae [M(L)2] (where M = Co(II) and Zn(II), [M(L)Cl(2H2O)]·H2O (where M = Ni(II) and Mn(II) were octahedral geometry). The computational studies were performed by DFT calculations to compare the optimized geometries with the experimental values. The interaction of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopic technique. Molecular docking studies were against three protein cancer to investigate the binding ability of the new compounds. The anticancer activity was studied with different cell lines and the IC50 of the Cu(II) complex for (HOP-62) showed a practical result. The LD50 values of Zn(II) and Co(II) complexes showed that they are non-toxic at doses up to 370 mg/kg. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Metal Coordination Complexes in Biological Systems)
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