Mechanisms and Treatments of Neurodegenerative Diseases

Dear Colleagues,

Neurodegenerative diseases encompass a number of disorders that primarily affect neurons in the human nervous system. Neurons are the building blocks of the nervous system. Normally, neurons do not reproduce or replace themselves, so the body cannot replace them with other neurons when they are damaged.

Neurodegenerative diseases are incurable and debilitating, resulting in the progressive degeneration and/or death of neurons. This causes several deficits that impair quality of life and increase the odds of morbidity and premature mortality in affected individuals. Both pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions can delay the progression of such diseases and, in some cases, the treatment of comorbid conditions can improve the quality of life of the individuals with neurodegenerative diseases.

This Topic wishes to shed new light on this exciting and insightful field of research from a multidisciplinary perspective. This Topic, “Mechanisms and Treatments of Neurodegenerative Diseases” will reflect the intense interplay between neurology and neuroscience as well as with other health sciences at the leading edge of this growing research field, which has led to suggestions of new opportunities for improving the diagnosis, treatment, and care of patients with neurodegenerative diseases, or to prevent adverse outcomes. In this Topic, the readership will find accounts of relevant research carried out by numerous healthcare professionals and researchers with extensive knowledge on basic and clinical settings, and the intention is to address new topics of interest of specific importance within the spectrum of basic research to clinical practice.

Prof. Dr. Omar Cauli
Dr. Pilar Pérez-Ros
Dr. Vanessa Ibáñez del Valle
Topic Editors

Article processing charge will be waived for all accepted manuscripts in Physiologia from 1 May to 31 December 2021.

Deadline for abstract submissions: 31 March 2022.
Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2022.

Topic Board

Dr. Pilar Pérez-Ros
E-Mail Website
Topic Editor
1. Department of Nursing, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
2. Frailty Research Organized Group (FROG), University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: aging; cognitive impairment; delirium; quality of life; frailty; sarcopenia; exercise
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Vanessa Ibáñez-del Valle
E-Mail Website
Topic Editor
1. Department of Nursing, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
2. Frailty Research Organized Group (FROG), University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: sleep; sleep assessment methods; inflammatory ; biomarkers; mental health; nursing; cognitive impairment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • dementia
  • autoimmune disorders
  • biomarkers
  • gender differences
  • cellular pathology
  • treatment
  • palliative care
  • comorbidity
  • risk and prognostic factors
  • chronic conditions
  • caregiver
  • health education

Relevant Journals List

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Life
life
3.817 2.6 2011 14.05 Days 1600 CHF Submit
Diseases
diseases
- - 2013 19.8 Days 1400 CHF Submit
Physiologia
physiologia
- - 2021 0 Days 1000 CHF Submit
Brain Sciences
brainsci
3.394 3.0 2011 18.29 Days 1800 CHF Submit
Medicina
medicina
2.430 1.7 1920 21.07 Days 1500 CHF Submit

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Systematic Review
The Neuroprotective Effects of Cannabis-Derived Phytocannabinoids and Resveratrol in Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Literature Review of Pre-Clinical Studies
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(12), 1573; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/brainsci11121573 - 28 Nov 2021
Abstract
Currently, there are no pharmacological treatments able to reverse nigral degeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD), hence the unmet need for the provision of neuroprotective agents. Cannabis-derived phytocannabinoids (CDCs) and resveratrol (RSV) may be useful neuroprotective agents for PD due to their anti-oxidative and [...] Read more.
Currently, there are no pharmacological treatments able to reverse nigral degeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD), hence the unmet need for the provision of neuroprotective agents. Cannabis-derived phytocannabinoids (CDCs) and resveratrol (RSV) may be useful neuroprotective agents for PD due to their anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To evaluate this, we undertook a systematic review of the scientific literature to assess the neuroprotective effects of CDCs and RSV treatments in pre-clinical in vivo animal models of PD. The literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, PubMed, and Web of Science core collection were systematically searched to cover relevant studies. A total of 1034 publications were analyzed, of which 18 met the eligibility criteria for this review. Collectively, the majority of PD rodent studies demonstrated that treatment with CDCs or RSV produced a significant improvement in motor function and mitigated the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Biochemical analysis of rodent brain tissue suggested that neuroprotection was mediated by anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. This review highlights the neuroprotective potential of CDCs and RSV for in vivo models of PD and therefore suggests their potential translation to human clinical trials to either ameliorate PD progression and/or be implemented as a prophylactic means to reduce the risk of development of PD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Mechanisms and Treatments of Neurodegenerative Diseases)
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Article
Advanced Parkinson’s Disease Treatment Simplification and Long-Term Outcomes with Levodopa Carbidopa Intestinal Gel: COSMOS Romanian Subanalysis
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(12), 1566; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/brainsci11121566 - 27 Nov 2021
Abstract
The aim of the COmedication Study assessing Mono- and cOmbination therapy with levodopa-carbidopa inteStinal gel (COSMOS) was to assess the use of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) as monotherapy in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (APD) in routine clinical practice. COSMOS was an international [...] Read more.
The aim of the COmedication Study assessing Mono- and cOmbination therapy with levodopa-carbidopa inteStinal gel (COSMOS) was to assess the use of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) as monotherapy in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (APD) in routine clinical practice. COSMOS was an international observational study with one cross-sectional visit and retrospective data collection. In Romania, 95 adult patients with APD on LCIG treatment for at least 12 months were enrolled and stratified according to their LCIG therapy after 12 months: monotherapy (without any add-on PD medication), monotherapy with night PD medication and LCIG + add-on medication. Compared to the moment of LCIG initiation, the percentage of patients on monotherapy increased at three months after LCIG initiation and remained constant up to 12 months, when 30.5% of the patients were on LCIG monotherapy and 11.6% were on monotherapy with night medication. “Off” time and “On” time with dyskinesia decreased from LCIG initiation to patient visit in all groups. LCIG monotherapy with or without night medication may provide a simplified treatment option for selected APD patients, with long-term efficacy similar to that of LCIG plus add-on medication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Mechanisms and Treatments of Neurodegenerative Diseases)
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Article
Relationship between Amyloid-β Deposition and the Coupling between Structural and Functional Brain Networks in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(11), 1535; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/brainsci11111535 - 19 Nov 2021
Abstract
Previous studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) pathologies has distinctive stage-specific effects on the structural and functional brain networks along the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) continuum. A more comprehensive account of both types of brain network may provide a better characterization [...] Read more.
Previous studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) pathologies has distinctive stage-specific effects on the structural and functional brain networks along the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) continuum. A more comprehensive account of both types of brain network may provide a better characterization of the stage-specific effects of Aβ pathologies. A potential candidate for this joint characterization is the coupling between the structural and functional brain networks (SC-FC coupling). We therefore investigated the effect of Aβ accumulation on global SC-FC coupling in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), AD, and healthy controls. Patients with MCI were dichotomized according to their level of Aβ pathology seen in 18F-flutemetamol PET-CT scans—namely, Aβ-negative and Aβ-positive. Our results show that there was no difference in global SC-FC coupling between different cohorts. During the prodromal AD stage, there was a significant negative correlation between the level of Aβ pathology and the global SC-FC coupling of MCI patients with positive Aβ, but no significant correlation for MCI patients with negative Aβ. During the AD dementia stage, the correlation between Aβ pathology and global SC-FC coupling in patients with AD was positive. Our results suggest that Aβ pathology has distinctive stage-specific effects on global coupling between the structural and functional brain networks along the AD continuum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Mechanisms and Treatments of Neurodegenerative Diseases)
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