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Article

Management of Aromatase Inhibitor–Induced Arthralgia

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Received: 7 November 2009 / Revised: 8 December 2009 / Accepted: 2 January 2010 / Published: 1 February 2010
Aromatase inhibitors (AIS) are commonly used as adjuvant treatment in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor–positive early breast cancer. With both steroidal and nonsteroidal AIS, AI-induced arthralgia is frequently observed. The mechanism of AI-induced arthralgia remains unknown, and the data available from clinical trails using AIS are limited. We review the pertinent information from a clinical perspective, including an algorithm to treat AI-induced arthralgia.
Keywords: aromatase inhibitors; arthritis; arthralgia; breast cancer aromatase inhibitors; arthritis; arthralgia; breast cancer
MDPI and ACS Style

Younus, J.; Kligman, L. Management of Aromatase Inhibitor–Induced Arthralgia. Curr. Oncol. 2010, 17, 87-90. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v17i1.474

AMA Style

Younus J, Kligman L. Management of Aromatase Inhibitor–Induced Arthralgia. Current Oncology. 2010; 17(1):87-90. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v17i1.474

Chicago/Turabian Style

Younus, J., and L. Kligman 2010. "Management of Aromatase Inhibitor–Induced Arthralgia" Current Oncology 17, no. 1: 87-90. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v17i1.474

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