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Article

Low Impact Development Design—Integrating Suitability Analysis and Site Planning for Reduction of Post-Development Stormwater Quantity

1
School of Planning, College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0016, USA
2
Sustainable Environments Branch, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268, USA
3
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0071, USA
4
North Appalachian Experimental Watershed, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Coshocton, OH 43812, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2010, 2(8), 2467-2482; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su2082467
Received: 29 June 2010 / Revised: 14 July 2010 / Accepted: 30 July 2010 / Published: 3 August 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use and Sustainability)
A land-suitability analysis (LSA) was integrated with open-space conservation principles, based on watershed physiographic and soil characteristics, to derive a low-impact development (LID) residential plan for a three hectare site in Coshocton OH, USA. The curve number method was used to estimate total runoff depths expected from different frequency storms for: (i) the pre-development condition, (ii) a conventional design, (iii) LID design based on the LSA of same building size; and (iv) LID design based on the LSA with reduced building footprints. Post-development runoff depths for the conventional design increased by 55 percent over those for the pre-development condition. Runoff depth for the same building size LSA-LID design was only 26 percent greater than that for the pre-development condition, and 17% for the design with reduced building sizes. Results suggest that prudent use of LSA may improve prospects and functionality of low-impact development, reduce stormwater flooding volumes and, hence, lower site-development costs. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil survey; runoff; soil hydrologic group; urbanization; suitability analysis soil survey; runoff; soil hydrologic group; urbanization; suitability analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, X.; Shuster, W.; Pal, C.; Buchberger, S.; Bonta, J.; Avadhanula, K. Low Impact Development Design—Integrating Suitability Analysis and Site Planning for Reduction of Post-Development Stormwater Quantity. Sustainability 2010, 2, 2467-2482. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su2082467

AMA Style

Wang X, Shuster W, Pal C, Buchberger S, Bonta J, Avadhanula K. Low Impact Development Design—Integrating Suitability Analysis and Site Planning for Reduction of Post-Development Stormwater Quantity. Sustainability. 2010; 2(8):2467-2482. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su2082467

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wang, Xinhao, William Shuster, Chandrima Pal, Steven Buchberger, James Bonta, and Kiran Avadhanula. 2010. "Low Impact Development Design—Integrating Suitability Analysis and Site Planning for Reduction of Post-Development Stormwater Quantity" Sustainability 2, no. 8: 2467-2482. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su2082467

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