Next Article in Journal
Extracellular Vesicles Mediated Early Embryo–Maternal Interactions
Next Article in Special Issue
Comparative Metabolomic Analysis Reveals Distinct Flavonoid Biosynthesis Regulation for Leaf Color Development of Cymbidium sinense ‘Red Sun’
Previous Article in Journal
Surgical Wound Fluids from Patients with Breast Cancer Reveal Similarities in the Biological Response Induced by Intraoperative Radiation Therapy and the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect—Transcriptomic Approach
Previous Article in Special Issue
An Overview of Orchid Protocorm-Like Bodies: Mass Propagation, Biotechnology, Molecular Aspects, and Breeding
Review

Volatile Organic Compounds from Orchids: From Synthesis and Function to Gene Regulation

1
Floriculture Research Division, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, RDA, Wanju-gun, Jellabuk-do 55365, Korea
2
World Vegetable Center Korea Office (WKO), Wanju-gun, Jellabuk-do 55365, Korea
3
Department of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology, Seoul National University (SNU), Seoul 08826, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(3), 1160; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21031160
Received: 31 December 2019 / Revised: 4 February 2020 / Accepted: 7 February 2020 / Published: 10 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orchid Biochemistry)
Orchids are one of the most significant plants that have ecologically adapted to every habitat on earth. Orchids show a high level of variation in their floral morphologies, which makes them popular as ornamental plants in the global market. Floral scent and color are key traits for many floricultural crops. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play vital roles in pollinator attraction, defense, and interaction with the environment. Recent progress in omics technology has led to the isolation of genes encoding candidate enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis and regulatory circuits of plant VOCs. Uncovering the biosynthetic pathways and regulatory mechanisms underlying the production of floral scents is necessary not only for a better understanding of the function of relevant genes but also for the generation of new cultivars with desirable traits through molecular breeding approaches. However, little is known about the pathways responsible for floral scents in orchids because of their long life cycle as well as the complex and large genome; only partial terpenoid pathways have been reported in orchids. Here, we review the biosynthesis and regulation of floral volatile compounds in orchids. In particular, we focused on the genes responsible for volatile compounds in various tissues and developmental stages in Cymbidium orchids. We also described the emission of orchid floral volatiles and their function in pollination ecology. Taken together, this review will provide a broad scope for the study of orchid floral scents. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cymbidium; floral scents; Orchidaceae; pollination; volatile organic compounds Cymbidium; floral scents; Orchidaceae; pollination; volatile organic compounds
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Ramya, M.; Jang, S.; An, H.-R.; Lee, S.-Y.; Park, P.-M.; Park, P.H. Volatile Organic Compounds from Orchids: From Synthesis and Function to Gene Regulation. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 1160. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21031160

AMA Style

Ramya M, Jang S, An H-R, Lee S-Y, Park P-M, Park PH. Volatile Organic Compounds from Orchids: From Synthesis and Function to Gene Regulation. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(3):1160. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21031160

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ramya, Mummadireddy, Seonghoe Jang, Hye-Ryun An, Su-Young Lee, Pil-Man Park, and Pue H. Park 2020. "Volatile Organic Compounds from Orchids: From Synthesis and Function to Gene Regulation" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 3: 1160. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21031160

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop