Next Article in Journal
Karyopherin α-2 Mediates MDC1 Nuclear Import through a Functional Nuclear Localization Signal in the tBRCT Domain of MDC1
Next Article in Special Issue
The Expression Profile of Dental Pulp-Derived Stromal Cells Supports Their Limited Capacity to Differentiate into Adipogenic Cells
Previous Article in Journal
CD44 Can Compensate for IgSF11 Deficiency by Associating with the Scaffold Protein PSD-95 during Osteoclast Differentiation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Lipid Deposition and Mobilisation in Atlantic Salmon Adipocytes
Review

Myocardium Metabolism in Physiological and Pathophysiological States: Implications of Epicardial Adipose Tissue and Potential Therapeutic Targets

1
Translational Cardiology Group, Health Research Institute, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
2
Cardiovascular Department, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
3
Cardiology Group, Health Research Institute, 17582 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
4
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Cardiovasculares (CIBERCV), 28029 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(7), 2641; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072641
Received: 5 March 2020 / Revised: 5 April 2020 / Accepted: 8 April 2020 / Published: 10 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adipogenesis and Adipose Tissue Metabolism)
The main energy substrate of adult cardiomyocytes for their contractility are the fatty acids. Its metabolism generates high ATP levels at the expense of high oxygen consumption in the mitochondria. Under low oxygen supply, they can get energy from other substrates, mainly glucose, lactate, ketone bodies, etc., but the mitochondrial dysfunction, in pathological conditions, reduces the oxidative metabolism. In consequence, fatty acids are stored into epicardial fat and its accumulation provokes inflammation, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress, which enhance the myocardium dysfunction. Some therapies focused on improvement the fatty acids entry into mitochondria have failed to demonstrate benefits on cardiovascular disorders. Oppositely, those therapies with effects on epicardial fat volume and inflammation might improve the oxidative metabolism of myocardium and might reduce the cardiovascular disease progression. This review aims at explain (a) the energy substrate adaptation of myocardium in physiological conditions, (b) the reduction of oxidative metabolism in pathological conditions and consequences on epicardial fat accumulation and insulin resistance, and (c) the reduction of cardiovascular outcomes after regulation by some therapies. View Full-Text
Keywords: myocardium; epicardial adipose tissue; metabolism; therapies myocardium; epicardial adipose tissue; metabolism; therapies
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gandoy-Fieiras, N.; Gonzalez-Juanatey, J.R.; Eiras, S. Myocardium Metabolism in Physiological and Pathophysiological States: Implications of Epicardial Adipose Tissue and Potential Therapeutic Targets. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 2641. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072641

AMA Style

Gandoy-Fieiras N, Gonzalez-Juanatey JR, Eiras S. Myocardium Metabolism in Physiological and Pathophysiological States: Implications of Epicardial Adipose Tissue and Potential Therapeutic Targets. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(7):2641. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072641

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gandoy-Fieiras, Nerea; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R.; Eiras, Sonia. 2020. "Myocardium Metabolism in Physiological and Pathophysiological States: Implications of Epicardial Adipose Tissue and Potential Therapeutic Targets" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 21, no. 7: 2641. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072641

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop