Next Article in Journal
Challenges in Biomaterial-Based Drug Delivery Approach for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases: Opportunities for Extracellular Vesicles
Next Article in Special Issue
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 and Taste Perception: From Molecular Mechanisms to Potential Clinical Implications
Previous Article in Journal
How to Build and to Protect the Neuromuscular Junction: The Role of the Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Article

Chronic Effects of a High Sucrose Diet on Murine Gastrointestinal Nutrient Sensor Gene and Protein Expression Levels and Lipid Metabolism

1
Nutritional Sciences Division, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, School of Life Courses, King’s College London, Room 3.114, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, UK
2
Department of Biochemistry, Memorial University, Elizabeth Avenue, St. John’s, NL A1C5S7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(1), 137; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22010137
Received: 15 November 2020 / Revised: 11 December 2020 / Accepted: 16 December 2020 / Published: 25 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolic Syndrome: From Molecular Mechanisms to Novel Therapies)
The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) plays a key role in regulating nutrient metabolism and appetite responses. This study aimed to identify changes in the GIT that are important in the development of diet related obesity and diabetes. GIT samples were obtained from C57BL/6J male mice chronically fed a control diet or a high sucrose diet (HSD) and analysed for changes in gene, protein and metabolite levels. In HSD mice, GIT expression levels of fat oxidation genes were reduced, and increased de novo lipogenesis was evident in ileum. Gene expression levels of the putative sugar sensor, slc5a4a and slc5a4b, and fat sensor, cd36, were downregulated in the small intestines of HSD mice. In HSD mice, there was also evidence of bacterial overgrowth and a lipopolysaccharide activated inflammatory pathway involving inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In Caco-2 cells, sucrose significantly increased the expression levels of the nos2, iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) gas levels. In conclusion, sucrose fed induced obesity/diabetes is associated with changes in GI macronutrient sensing, appetite regulation and nutrient metabolism and intestinal microflora. These may be important drivers, and thus therapeutic targets, of diet-related metabolic disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: gastrointestinal; sucrose; nutrient sensors and transporters; gut peptides; nitric oxide gastrointestinal; sucrose; nutrient sensors and transporters; gut peptides; nitric oxide
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

O’Brien, P.; Han, G.; Ganpathy, P.; Pitre, S.; Zhang, Y.; Ryan, J.; Sim, P.Y.; Harding, S.V.; Gray, R.; Preedy, V.R.; Sanders, T.A.B.; Corpe, C.P. Chronic Effects of a High Sucrose Diet on Murine Gastrointestinal Nutrient Sensor Gene and Protein Expression Levels and Lipid Metabolism. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 137. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22010137

AMA Style

O’Brien P, Han G, Ganpathy P, Pitre S, Zhang Y, Ryan J, Sim PY, Harding SV, Gray R, Preedy VR, Sanders TAB, Corpe CP. Chronic Effects of a High Sucrose Diet on Murine Gastrointestinal Nutrient Sensor Gene and Protein Expression Levels and Lipid Metabolism. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(1):137. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22010137

Chicago/Turabian Style

O’Brien, Patrick, Ge Han, Priya Ganpathy, Shweta Pitre, Yi Zhang, John Ryan, Pei Y. Sim, Scott V. Harding, Robert Gray, Victor R. Preedy, Thomas A.B. Sanders, and Christopher P. Corpe 2021. "Chronic Effects of a High Sucrose Diet on Murine Gastrointestinal Nutrient Sensor Gene and Protein Expression Levels and Lipid Metabolism" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 1: 137. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22010137

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop