Next Article in Journal
Cell and Molecular Biology of Thyroid Disorders 2.0
Next Article in Special Issue
Genetic Regulation of Physiological Reproductive Lifespan and Female Fertility
Previous Article in Journal
Intranuclear Delivery of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B p65 in a Rat Model of Tooth Replantation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Metabolomic Insight into Polycystic Ovary Syndrome—An Overview
Review

Metabolic Syndrome and Reproduction

1
Andrology, Female Endocrinology and Gender Incongruence Unit, Department of Experimental, Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, 50139 Florence, Italy
2
Endocrinology Unit, Medical Department, Maggiore-Bellaria Hospital, Azienda-Usl Bologna, 40139 Bologna, Italy
3
Endocrinology Unit, Department of Experimental, Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, 50139 Florence, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Micheline Misrahi and Ilpo Huhtaniemi
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(4), 1988; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22041988
Received: 14 January 2021 / Revised: 8 February 2021 / Accepted: 11 February 2021 / Published: 17 February 2021
Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and infertility are two afflictions with a high prevalence in the general population. MetS is a global health problem increasing worldwide, while infertility affects up to 12% of men. Despite the high prevalence of these conditions, the possible impact of MetS on male fertility has been investigated by a few authors only in the last decade. In addition, underlying mechanism(s) connecting the two conditions have been investigated in few preclinical studies. The aim of this review is to summarize and critically discuss available clinical and preclinical studies on the role of MetS (and its treatment) in male fertility. An extensive Medline search was performed identifying studies in the English language. While several studies support an association between MetS and hypogonadism, contrasting results have been reported on the relationship between MetS and semen parameters/male infertility, and the available studies considered heterogeneous MetS definitions and populations. So far, only two meta-analyses in clinical and preclinical studies, respectively, evaluated this topic, reporting a negative association between MetS and sperm parameters, testosterone and FSH levels, advocating, however, larger prospective investigations. In conclusion, a possible negative impact of MetS on male reproductive potential was reported; however, larger studies are needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolic syndrome; male infertility; infertile and fertile men; semen parameters; sperm parameters; sperm DNA fragmentation; hypogonadism; testosterone; gonadotropins; treatment metabolic syndrome; male infertility; infertile and fertile men; semen parameters; sperm parameters; sperm DNA fragmentation; hypogonadism; testosterone; gonadotropins; treatment
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lotti, F.; Marchiani, S.; Corona, G.; Maggi, M. Metabolic Syndrome and Reproduction. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 1988. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22041988

AMA Style

Lotti F, Marchiani S, Corona G, Maggi M. Metabolic Syndrome and Reproduction. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(4):1988. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22041988

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lotti, Francesco, Sara Marchiani, Giovanni Corona, and Mario Maggi. 2021. "Metabolic Syndrome and Reproduction" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 4: 1988. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22041988

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop