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Article

Smoking and Looked-After Children: A Mixed-Methods Study of Policy, Practice, and Perceptions Relating to Tobacco Use in Residential Units

1
UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, Division of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG5 1PB, UK
2
Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Linda Bauld and Rosemary Hiscock
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(6), 593; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph13060593
Received: 6 April 2016 / Revised: 6 June 2016 / Accepted: 7 June 2016 / Published: 15 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tobacco Control and Priority Groups)
Despite the implementation of smoke-free policies by local authorities and a statutory requirement to promote the health and well-being of looked-after children and young people in England, rates of tobacco use by this population are substantially higher than in the general youth population. A mixed-methods study, comprising a survey of residential care officers in 15 local authority-operated residential units and semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with residential carers in three local authority-operated residential units, was conducted in the East Midlands. Survey data were descriptively analysed; and interview data were transcribed and analysed using thematic framework analysis. Forty-two care officers (18% response rate) completed the survey, and 14 participated in the interviews. Despite reporting substantial awareness of smoke-free policies, a lack of adherence and enforcement became apparent, and levels of reported training in relation to smoking and smoking cessation were low (21%). Potential problems relating to wider tobacco-related harms, such as exploitative relationships; a reliance on tacit knowledge; and pessimistic attitudes towards LAC quitting smoking, were indicated. The findings highlight the need for the development of comprehensive strategies to promote adherence to and enforcement of local smoke-free policy within residential units for looked-after children and young people, and to ensure appropriate support pathways are in place for this population. View Full-Text
Keywords: smoking; smoking cessation; looked-after children; residential care smoking; smoking cessation; looked-after children; residential care
MDPI and ACS Style

Huddlestone, L.; Pritchard, C.; Ratschen, E. Smoking and Looked-After Children: A Mixed-Methods Study of Policy, Practice, and Perceptions Relating to Tobacco Use in Residential Units. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 593. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph13060593

AMA Style

Huddlestone L, Pritchard C, Ratschen E. Smoking and Looked-After Children: A Mixed-Methods Study of Policy, Practice, and Perceptions Relating to Tobacco Use in Residential Units. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2016; 13(6):593. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph13060593

Chicago/Turabian Style

Huddlestone, Lisa, Catherine Pritchard, and Elena Ratschen. 2016. "Smoking and Looked-After Children: A Mixed-Methods Study of Policy, Practice, and Perceptions Relating to Tobacco Use in Residential Units" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 13, no. 6: 593. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph13060593

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