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Article

Living a Healthy Life in Australia: Exploring Influences on Health for Refugees from Myanmar

1
School of Health Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn 3122, Australia
2
Office of Pro-Vice Chancellor (Student Engagement), Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn 3122, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 121; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010121
Received: 22 November 2019 / Revised: 18 December 2019 / Accepted: 19 December 2019 / Published: 23 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Health and Wellbeing of Migrant Populations)
Background: Humanitarian migrants from Myanmar represent a significant refugee group in Australia; however, knowledge of their health needs and priorities is limited. This study aims to explore the meaning and influencers of health from the perspectives of refugees from Myanmar. Method: Using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) design, a partnership was formed between the researchers, Myanmar community leaders and other service providers to inform study design. A total of 27 participants were recruited from a government-funded English language program. Data were collected using a short demographic survey and four focus groups, and were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis methods. Results: Key themes identified included: (1) health according to the perspectives of Australian settled refugees from Myanmar, (2) social connections and what it means to be part of community, (3) work as a key influence on health, and (4) education and its links with work and health. Conclusions: This study outlined the inter-relationships between health, social connections, work and education from the perspectives of refugees from Myanmar. It also outlined how people from Myanmar who are of a refugee background possess strengths that can be used to manage the various health challenges they face in their new environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: migrants; refugees; asylum seekers; adults; health promotion; primary health care; community-based participatory research; focus groups; social support; work; education; access to healthcare migrants; refugees; asylum seekers; adults; health promotion; primary health care; community-based participatory research; focus groups; social support; work; education; access to healthcare
MDPI and ACS Style

Wong, C.K.; White, C.; Thay, B.; Lassemillante, A.-C.M. Living a Healthy Life in Australia: Exploring Influences on Health for Refugees from Myanmar. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 121. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010121

AMA Style

Wong CK, White C, Thay B, Lassemillante A-CM. Living a Healthy Life in Australia: Exploring Influences on Health for Refugees from Myanmar. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(1):121. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010121

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wong, Carrie K., Carolynne White, Bwe Thay, and Annie-Claude M. Lassemillante 2020. "Living a Healthy Life in Australia: Exploring Influences on Health for Refugees from Myanmar" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 1: 121. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010121

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