Next Article in Journal
Experiences of Overseas Trained Physical Therapists Working in Saudi Arabia: An Observational Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Acceptability and Feasibility of Best Practice School Lunches by Elementary School-Aged Children in a Serve Setting: A Randomized Crossover Trial
Previous Article in Journal
4D-BIM-Based Workspace Planning for Temporary Safety Facilities in Construction SMEs
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Effect of the Promotion of Vegetables by a Social Influencer on Adolescents’ Subsequent Vegetable Intake: A Pilot Study
Article

Self-Persuasion Increases Healthy Eating Intention Depending on Cultural Background

1
Institute of Governance, Shandong University, Qingdao 266237, China
2
School of Politics and Public Administration, Shandong University, Qingdao 266237, China
3
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3405; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103405
Received: 11 April 2020 / Revised: 9 May 2020 / Accepted: 11 May 2020 / Published: 13 May 2020
Unhealthy eating behavior has become a global health risk and thus needs to be influenced. Previous research has found that self-persuasion is more effective than direct persuasion in changing attitudes and behavioral intentions, but the influence of the cultural backgrounds of those being persuaded remains unclear. We conducted two studies to investigate the effectiveness of self-persuasion and direct persuasion techniques in promoting healthy eating intention among different ethnicities in the Netherlands. Native Dutch, Moroccan–Dutch, and Turkish–Dutch participated both online and offline. Participants saw a poster with either a self-persuasion message (“Why would you choose healthier food?”) or a direct persuasion message (“Choose healthier food!”), and were then asked to report their intention to eat healthily in the upcoming month. Significant cultural differences were found between native Dutch and Moroccan–Dutch in Study 1, and between the native Dutch and Turkish-Dutch who participated offline in Study 2. Accordingly, cultural background was found to moderate the relationship between persuasion and healthy eating intention among these groups. These results provided preliminary evidence for the moderation effect of persuasion on healthy eating intention: Self-persuasion appears to be more effective for people with an individualistic background, and direct persuasion appears to be more effective for people with a collectivistic background. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-persuasion; direct persuasion; cultural background; healthy eating intention; persuasion communication self-persuasion; direct persuasion; cultural background; healthy eating intention; persuasion communication
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Li, S.; van Halen, C.; van Baaren, R.B.; Müller, B.C.N. Self-Persuasion Increases Healthy Eating Intention Depending on Cultural Background. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3405. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103405

AMA Style

Li S, van Halen C, van Baaren RB, Müller BCN. Self-Persuasion Increases Healthy Eating Intention Depending on Cultural Background. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(10):3405. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103405

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Shuang, Cor van Halen, Rick B. van Baaren, and Barbara C.N. Müller 2020. "Self-Persuasion Increases Healthy Eating Intention Depending on Cultural Background" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 10: 3405. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103405

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop