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J. Xenobiot., Volume 11, Issue 1 (March 2021) – 2 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): As with most malignancies, metastatic prostate cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related mortalities in men, and the number one site for prostate cancer cells to metastasize is the bone. Natalie Silk et al. (2021, 11(1), 16-32) systemically reviewed how the natural product resveratrol (RSV) represses prostate cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis by targeting the tumor microenvironment. The authors specifically focused on RSV’s effects on the communications between the cancer cells and the stroma. The cover image depicted a virtual RSV wall inhibiting prostate cancer cell bone metastasis by blocking the cell-to-cell communications between the cancerous and stromal cells. View this paper
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Review
The Effects of Resveratrol on Prostate Cancer through Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment
J. Xenobiot. 2021, 11(1), 16-32; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jox11010002 - 01 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 813
Abstract
Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in men in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Since over 60% of prostate cancer cases occur in men over 65 years of age, and this population [...] Read more.
Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in men in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Since over 60% of prostate cancer cases occur in men over 65 years of age, and this population will increase steadily in the coming years, prostate cancer will be a major cancer-related burden in the foreseeable future. Accumulating data from more recent research suggest that the tumor microenvironment (TME) plays a previously unrecognized role in every stage of cancer development, including initiation, proliferation, and metastasis. Prostate cancer is not only diagnosed in the late stages of life, but also progresses relatively slowly. This makes prostate cancer an ideal model system for exploring the potential of natural products as cancer prevention and/or treatment reagents because they usually act relatively slowly compared to most synthetic drugs. Resveratrol (RSV) is a naturally occurring stilbenoid and possesses strong anti-cancer properties with few adverse effects. Accumulating data from both in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that RSV can interfere with prostate cancer initiation and progression by targeting the TME. Therefore, this review is aimed to summarize the recent advancement in RSV-inhibited prostate cancer initiation, proliferation, and metastasis as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms, with particular emphasis on the effect of RSV on TME. This will not only better our understanding of prostate cancer TMEs, but also pave the way for the development of RSV as a potential reagent for prostate cancer prevention and/or therapy. Full article
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Perspective
Improving Exposure Assessment Using Non-Targeted and Suspect Screening: The ISO/IEC 17025: 2017 Quality Standard as a Guideline
J. Xenobiot. 2021, 11(1), 1-15; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jox11010001 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 873
Abstract
The recent advances of novel methodologies such as non-targeted and suspect screening based on high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) have paved the way to a new paradigm for exposure assessment. These methodologies allow to profile simultaneously thousands of small unknown molecules present in environmental [...] Read more.
The recent advances of novel methodologies such as non-targeted and suspect screening based on high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) have paved the way to a new paradigm for exposure assessment. These methodologies allow to profile simultaneously thousands of small unknown molecules present in environmental and biological samples, and therefore hold great promises in order to identify more efficiently hazardous contaminants potentially associated with increased risks of developing adverse health outcomes. In order to further explore the potential of these methodologies and push the transition from research applications towards regulatory purposes, robust harmonized quality standards have to be implemented. Here, we discuss the feasibility of using ISO/IEC 17025: 2017 as a guideline to implement non-targeted and suspect screening methodologies in laboratories, whether it is for accreditation purposes or not. More specifically, we identified and then discussed how specificities of non-targeted HRMS methodology can be accounted for in order to comply with the specific items of ISO/IEC 17025: 2017. We also discussed other specificities of HRMS methodologies (e.g., need for digital storage capacity) that are so far not included in the ISO/IEC 17025 requirements but should be considered. This works aims to fuel and expand the discussion in order to subsidize new opportunities of harmonization for non-targeted and suspect screening. Full article
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