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Article

Incivility in Higher Education: Challenges of Inclusion for Neurodiverse Students with Traumatic Brain Injury in Ireland

1
School of Education, University of Limerick, V94 H58H Limerick, Ireland
2
School of Inclusive and Special Education, Dublin City University, 9 Dublin, Ireland
3
Student Affairs, University of Limerick, V94 H58H Limerick, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Gregor Wolbring
Received: 17 May 2021 / Revised: 10 June 2021 / Accepted: 10 June 2021 / Published: 13 June 2021
This paper explores the lived experience of incivility for neurodiverse students with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Ireland. The higher education (HE) environment can be challenging for students with TBI. Incivility is common in higher education, and students with disabilities such as TBI are often marginalized within academia, making them more vulnerable to incivility. For this paper, data are drawn from the first author’s autoethnographic study, and is supplemented with semi-structured interviews from a sample of HE seven students also with TBI. Results revealed that participants’ experiences of incivility were common and were linked to the organizational culture of higher education. Our experiences point to a need for better responsiveness when interactions are frequently uncivil, despite there being policies that recognize diversity and equality. This is the first paper of its kind to explore this particular experience in Ireland and the purpose of this paper is to raise awareness of the challenges of neurodiverse students and how they are exacerbated by organizational and interpersonal incivility. View Full-Text
Keywords: incivility; students with traumatic brain injury; higher education; power incivility; students with traumatic brain injury; higher education; power
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shiels, T.; Kenny, N.; Shiels, R.; Mannix-McNamara, P. Incivility in Higher Education: Challenges of Inclusion for Neurodiverse Students with Traumatic Brain Injury in Ireland. Societies 2021, 11, 60. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020060

AMA Style

Shiels T, Kenny N, Shiels R, Mannix-McNamara P. Incivility in Higher Education: Challenges of Inclusion for Neurodiverse Students with Traumatic Brain Injury in Ireland. Societies. 2021; 11(2):60. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020060

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shiels, Teresa, Neil Kenny, Roy Shiels, and Patricia Mannix-McNamara. 2021. "Incivility in Higher Education: Challenges of Inclusion for Neurodiverse Students with Traumatic Brain Injury in Ireland" Societies 11, no. 2: 60. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020060

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