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Review

A Decade in Review: Alaska’s Adaptive Management of an Invasive Apex Predator

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Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Anchorage, AK 99518, USA
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Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Soldotna, AK 99669, USA
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Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Palmer, AK 99645, USA
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Tyonek Tribal Conservation District, Anchorage, AK 99501, USA
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Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association, Kenai, AK 99611, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 March 2020 / Revised: 9 April 2020 / Accepted: 15 April 2020 / Published: 21 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology and Control of Invasive Fishes)
Northern pike are an invasive species in southcentral Alaska and have caused the decline and extirpation of salmonids and other native fish populations across the region. Over the last decade, adaptive management of invasive pike populations has included population suppression, eradication, outreach, angler engagement, and research to mitigate damages from pike where feasible. Pike suppression efforts have been focused in open drainages of the northern and western Cook Inlet areas, and eradication efforts have been primarily focused on the Kenai Peninsula and the municipality of Anchorage. Between 2010 and 2020, almost 40,000 pike were removed from southcentral Alaska waters as a result of suppression programs, and pike have been successfully eradicated from over 20 lakes and creeks from the Kenai Peninsula and Anchorage, nearly completing total eradication of pike from known distributions in those areas. Northern pike control actions are tailored to the unique conditions of waters prioritized for their management, and all efforts support the goal of preventing further spread of this invasive aquatic apex predator to vulnerable waters. View Full-Text
Keywords: suppression; eradication; rotenone; fishery restoration; northern pike; salmon suppression; eradication; rotenone; fishery restoration; northern pike; salmon
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dunker, K.; Massengill, R.; Bradley, P.; Jacobson, C.; Swenson, N.; Wizik, A.; DeCino, R. A Decade in Review: Alaska’s Adaptive Management of an Invasive Apex Predator. Fishes 2020, 5, 12. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fishes5020012

AMA Style

Dunker K, Massengill R, Bradley P, Jacobson C, Swenson N, Wizik A, DeCino R. A Decade in Review: Alaska’s Adaptive Management of an Invasive Apex Predator. Fishes. 2020; 5(2):12. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fishes5020012

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dunker, Kristine, Robert Massengill, Parker Bradley, Cody Jacobson, Nicole Swenson, Andy Wizik, and Robert DeCino. 2020. "A Decade in Review: Alaska’s Adaptive Management of an Invasive Apex Predator" Fishes 5, no. 2: 12. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fishes5020012

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