Next Issue
Volume 4, March
Previous Issue
Volume 3, September

Plasma, Volume 3, Issue 4 (December 2020) – 5 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle
Design and Medical Effects of a Vaginal Cleaning Device Generating Plasma-Activated Water with Antimicrobial Activity on Bacterial Vaginosis
Plasma 2020, 3(4), 204-213; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/plasma3040016 - 17 Nov 2020
Viewed by 609
Abstract
Bacterial vaginosis is a common female disease caused by a vaginal infection due to an overgrowth of bacteria that naturally live in the vaginal tract. Bacterial vaginosis has frequently been treated with the oral or vaginal administration of antibiotics and topical disinfectants. However, [...] Read more.
Bacterial vaginosis is a common female disease caused by a vaginal infection due to an overgrowth of bacteria that naturally live in the vaginal tract. Bacterial vaginosis has frequently been treated with the oral or vaginal administration of antibiotics and topical disinfectants. However, hygienic application of topical treatment deep in the vagina remains difficult. Herein, we introduce a novel vaginal cleaning device using plasma-activated water generated from supplied water. Remarkably, plasma source generation at atmospheric pressure is well known to eradicate bacterial infection through the generation of free radicals and/or chlorine chemicals with antimicrobial activity. The device was designed to alleviate a bacterial infection by spraying plasma-activated water generated from a cleaning solution container with plasma modules. The spray nozzle contains both a clean outlet and a suction outlet to spray and recover the plasma water, respectively, and is connected to a disposable silicone tube. The other nozzle, which has a laser light and air pump, can perform a second sterilization and dry the vagina after washing. Free chlorine chemicals with antibacterial activity were detected in the plasma-activated water by the device. Clinical application in patients with bacterial vaginosis confirmed the stability and effectiveness of our device. Therefore, these results show a novel clinical application of atmospheric pressure plasma to medical field as a plasma medicine. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Plasma Activation as a Powerful Tool for Selective Modification of Cellulose Fibers towards Biomedical Applications
Plasma 2020, 3(4), 196-203; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/plasma3040015 - 16 Nov 2020
Viewed by 504
Abstract
Cellulosic substrates are known for their biocompatibility, non-cytotoxicity, hypoallergenicity and sterilizability. It is therefore desirable to have a bundle of methods to equip them with tailored properties such as affinity profiles for various applications. In the case of highly swelling materials such as [...] Read more.
Cellulosic substrates are known for their biocompatibility, non-cytotoxicity, hypoallergenicity and sterilizability. It is therefore desirable to have a bundle of methods to equip them with tailored properties such as affinity profiles for various applications. In the case of highly swelling materials such as cellulose sponges, “dry” functionalization using plasma activation is the method of choice. The purpose of the study was to adapt low-pressure plasma technology for targeted cellulose modification. Using plasma (pre-) treatment combined with gaseous reactants like O2, ethylene oxide or silane, three different cellulose modifications were obtained and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Swelling measurements and bacterial adhesion tests revealed distinctive material properties compared to educt. The development of these non-aqueous methods demonstrated an effective procedural route towards modified cellulosic materials for usage in wound dressing, micro patterned assays or bacterial filtration. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Polymerization of Solid-State Aminophenol to Polyaniline Derivative Using a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma
Plasma 2020, 3(4), 187-195; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/plasma3040014 - 30 Oct 2020
Viewed by 580
Abstract
We present a method to prepare polyaminophenol from solid-state aminophenol monomers using atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma. The polymerizations of o-aminophenol and m-aminophenol are studied. The polymers were analyzed via Fourier-Transform inferred spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. The kinetics [...] Read more.
We present a method to prepare polyaminophenol from solid-state aminophenol monomers using atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma. The polymerizations of o-aminophenol and m-aminophenol are studied. The polymers were analyzed via Fourier-Transform inferred spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. The kinetics of the polymerization reactions were investigated by using UV-vis and the polymerization was found to be first-order for both o-aminophenol and m-aminophenol. The resulting polymer film exhibits a conductivity of 1.0 × 10−5 S/m for poly-o-aminophenol (PoAP) and 2.3 × 10−5 S/m for poly-m-aminophenol (PmAP), which are two orders more conductive than undoped (~10−7 S/m) polyaniline (PANI), The PoAP has a quinoid structure and the PmAP has an open ring keto-derivative structure. The process provides a simple method of preparing conductive polyaminophenol films. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dielectric Barrier Discharges)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Monopole Contribution to the Stark Width of Hydrogenlike Spectral Lines in Plasmas: Analytical Results
Plasma 2020, 3(4), 180-186; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/plasma3040013 - 24 Oct 2020
Viewed by 499
Abstract
One of the most reliable and frequently used methods for diagnosing various laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is based on the Stark broadening of spectral lines. It allows for determining from the experimental line profiles important parameters, such as the electron density and temperature, [...] Read more.
One of the most reliable and frequently used methods for diagnosing various laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is based on the Stark broadening of spectral lines. It allows for determining from the experimental line profiles important parameters, such as the electron density and temperature, the ion density, the magnetic field, and the field strength of various types of the electrostatic plasma turbulence. Since, in this method, radiating atoms or ions are used as the sensitive probes of the above parameters, these probes have to be properly calibrated. In other words, an accurate theory of the Stark broadening of spectral lines in plasmas is required. In the present paper, we study, analytically, the monopole contribution to the Stark width of hydrogen-like spectral lines in plasmas. For this purpose, we use the formalism from paper by Mejri, Nguyen, and Ben Lakhdar. We show that the monopole contribution to the width has a non-monotonic dependence on the velocity of perturbing electrons. Namely, at relatively small electron velocities, the width decreases as the velocity increases. Then it reaches a minimum and (at relatively large electron velocities), as the velocity further increases, the width increases. The non-monotonic dependence of the monopole contribution to the width on the electron velocity is a counter-intuitive result. The outcome that at relatively large electron velocities, the monopole contribution to the width increases with the increase in the electron velocity is in a striking distinction to the dipole contribution to the width, which decreases as the electron velocity increases. We show that, in the situation encountered in various areas of plasma research (such as in magnetically-controlled fusion), where there is a relativistic electron beam (REB) in a plasma, the monopole contribution to the width due to the REB exceeds the corresponding dipole contribution by four orders of magnitude and practically determines the entire Stark width of hydrogenic spectral lines due to the REB. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Two-Parametric, Mathematically Undisclosed Solitary Electron Holes and Their Evolution Equation
Plasma 2020, 3(4), 166-179; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/plasma3040012 - 30 Sep 2020
Viewed by 739
Abstract
The examination of the mutual influence of the two main trapping scenarios, which are characterized by B and D and which in isolation yield the known sech4 (D=0) and Gaussian (B=0) electron holes, show [...] Read more.
The examination of the mutual influence of the two main trapping scenarios, which are characterized by B and D and which in isolation yield the known sech4 (D=0) and Gaussian (B=0) electron holes, show generalized, two-parametric solitary wave solutions. This increases the variety of hole solutions considerably beyond the two cases previously discussed, but at the expense of their mathematical disclosure, since ϕ(x), the electrical wave potential, can no longer be expressed analytically by known functions. Therefore, they belong to a variety with a partially hidden mathematical background, a hitherto unexplored world of structure formation, the origin of which is the chaotic individual particle dynamics at resonance in the coherent wave particle interaction. A third trapping scenario Γ, being independent of (B, D) and representing the perturbative trapping scenarios in lowest order, provides a broad, continuous band of associated phase velocities v0. For structures propagating near CSEA=1.307, the slowelectronacousticspeed, a Generalized Schamel equation is derived: φτ+[AB158φ+Dlnφ]φxφxxx=0, which governs their evolution. A is associated with the phase speed and τ:=CSEAt and φ:=ϕ/ψ0 are the renormalized time and electric potential, respectively, where ψ is the amplitude of the structure. Full article
Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop