Next Issue
Volume 2, March

Electron. Mater., Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2020) – 5 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): The thermal polymerisation of a bis(triphenylamine)-bis(styrene) monomer yielded an electroactive layer that underwent two stepwise oxidations. The perceived color of the film changed from colorless to yellow, followed by yellow to blue with applied potential. The immobilized film on ITO glass could reversibly switch between its colorless and blue states with applied potential upwards of 6 hours. The retention of the electrochemically induced blue color was contingent on the device architecture. More than 80% of the oxidized state’s color was maintained 30 min after the potential was turned off in a double-layer electrochromic device that was prepared from bis(triphenylamine) and viologen-based polymers. In contrast, 50% of the color of a single electroactive layer device layer bleached 7 min after the application of the potential was terminated. View this paper
  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Extending the Color Retention of an Electrochromic Device by Immobilizing Color Switching and Ion-Storage Complementary Layers
Electron. Mater. 2020, 1(1), 40-53; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/electronicmat1010005 - 14 Dec 2020
Viewed by 349
Abstract
The thermal polymerization of a bis(triphenylamine)-bis(styrene) monomer on ITO coated glass gave an electroactive film that underwent two stepwise oxidations. The perceived color change of the film upon stepwise oxidation was colorless-to-yellow followed by yellow-to-blue. The anodic cyclic voltammogram of the monomer was [...] Read more.
The thermal polymerization of a bis(triphenylamine)-bis(styrene) monomer on ITO coated glass gave an electroactive film that underwent two stepwise oxidations. The perceived color change of the film upon stepwise oxidation was colorless-to-yellow followed by yellow-to-blue. The anodic cyclic voltammogram of the monomer was consistent over multiple cycles. The immobilized film could be reversibly switched between its colorless and blue states with applied potential in both a half- and full-electrochromic functioning device. The devices could also reversibly switch their colors upwards of 6 h. The retention of the electrochemically induced blue color was contingent on the device architecture. Upwards of 80% of the color was maintained 30 min after the potential was turned off with the double-layer electrochromic device structure. This device was prepared from two electroactive layers: a bis(triphenylamine) and viologen-based polymers that were immobilized on the electrodes. In contrast, 50% of the color of the active electrochromic device that was prepared from a single electroactive layer bleached 7 min once the potential was no longer applied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers of Electronic Materials)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Coating 1-Octanethiol-Coated Copper Nano-Ink on a Paper Substrate via Multi-Pulse Flash Light Sintering for Application in Disposable Devices
Electron. Mater. 2020, 1(1), 28-39; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/electronicmat1010004 - 23 Sep 2020
Viewed by 443
Abstract
Inkjet-printed patterns were formed on a paper substrate using anti-oxidant copper nano-ink for application to disposable electronic devices. To prevent substrate damage, the pattern was flash light sintered under ambient conditions using the multi-pulse technique. Pure copper nanoparticles were coated with 1-octanethiol for [...] Read more.
Inkjet-printed patterns were formed on a paper substrate using anti-oxidant copper nano-ink for application to disposable electronic devices. To prevent substrate damage, the pattern was flash light sintered under ambient conditions using the multi-pulse technique. Pure copper nanoparticles were coated with 1-octanethiol for oxidation resistance using the dry-coating method. Mixing these with 1-octanol solvent at a concentration of 30 wt% produced the copper nano-ink. Photo paper was used as the substrate. The contact angle between the photo paper and copper nano-ink was 37.2° and the optimal energy density for the multi-pulse flash light sintering technique was 15.6 J/cm2. Using this energy density, the optimal conditions were an on-time of 2 ms (duty cycle of 80%) for three pulses. The resistivity of the resulting pattern was 2.8 × 10−7 Ω∙m. After bending 500 times to a radius of curvature of 30 mm, the relative resistance (ΔR/R0) of the multi-pulse flash light-sintered pattern hardly changed compared to that of the unbent pattern, while the single-pulse-sintered pattern showed dramatic increase by 8-fold compared to the unbent pattern. Therefore, the multi-pulse light sintering technique is a promising approach to produce an inkjet-printed pattern that can be applied to disposable electronic devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers of Electronic Materials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Synthesis and Characterization of Aero-Eutectic Graphite Obtained by Solidification and Its Application in Energy Storage: Cathodes for Lithium Oxygen Batteries
Electron. Mater. 2020, 1(1), 17-27; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/electronicmat1010003 - 03 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 563
Abstract
Aero-eutectic graphite can be defined as a new light material with hierarchically structured porosity. It is obtained from the solidification of gray cast irons, followed by the dissolution of the ferrous matrix by an acidic sequence. The result is a continuous and interconnected [...] Read more.
Aero-eutectic graphite can be defined as a new light material with hierarchically structured porosity. It is obtained from the solidification of gray cast irons, followed by the dissolution of the ferrous matrix by an acidic sequence. The result is a continuous and interconnected network of graphite sheets with varied dimensions randomly oriented. X-ray diffraction characterization has revealed graphite crystallographic planes (002), (100), (101), (102) and (004), while the surface area measured by BET and Langmuir methods has been determined in the order of 90 m2 g−1 and 336 m2 g−1, respectively. The process of obtaining eutectic aero-graphite also allows the deposit of Cu nanofilms and TiC particles. Aero-eutectic graphite has been tested as cathode in Li–O2 batteries as it has been prepared, without the addition of binders or conductive carbons, showing an appropriate contact with the electrolyte, so that the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions may develop satisfactorily. In the discharge-charge galvanostatic tests, the battery accomplishes 20 complete cycles with area capacity limited to 1.2 mAh cm−2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Design and Synthesis of Electrode Materials)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Standard Electrical Bonding Strategies for the Hybrid Integration of Inkjet-Printed Electronics
Electron. Mater. 2020, 1(1), 2-16; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/electronicmat1010002 - 30 Aug 2020
Viewed by 654
Abstract
Different conductive bonding strategies for the hybrid integration of flexible, inkjet-printed electronics are investigated. The focus of the present work lies on providing a practical guide comprising standard techniques that are inexpensive, easily implementable and frequently used. A sample set consisting of identical [...] Read more.
Different conductive bonding strategies for the hybrid integration of flexible, inkjet-printed electronics are investigated. The focus of the present work lies on providing a practical guide comprising standard techniques that are inexpensive, easily implementable and frequently used. A sample set consisting of identical conductive test structures on different paper and plastic substrates was prepared using silver (Ag) nanoparticle ink. The sintered specimens were electrically contacted using soldering, adhesive bonding and crimping. Electrical and mechanical characterization before and after exposing the samples to harsh environmental conditions was performed to evaluate the reliability of the bonding methods. Resistance measurements were done before and after connecting the specimens. Afterwards, 85 °C/85% damp-heat tests and tensile tests were applied. Adhesive bonding appears to be the most suitable and versatile method, as it shows adequate stability on all specimen substrates, especially after exposure to a 85 °C/85% damp-heat test. During exposure to mechanical tensile testing, adhesive bonding proved to be the most stable, and forces up to 12 N could be exerted until breakage of the connection. As a drawback, adhesive bonding showed the highest increase in electrical resistance among the different bonding strategies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEditorial
Introduction to a New Open-Access Journal by MDPI: Electronic Materials
Electron. Mater. 2020, 1(1), 1; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/electronicmat1010001 - 11 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 717
Abstract
Electronic materials are ubiquitous and essential for the daily lives of billions of people [...] Full article
Next Issue
Back to TopTop