Special Issue "Secondary Metabolites in Plant-Microbe Interactions"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Protection, Diseases, Pest and Weeds".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Anna Andolfi
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo Via Cintia 4, I-80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: secondary metabolites in plant-pathogen interaction; natural substances with biological activity; chromatographic techniques, spectroscopic methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Maria Michela Salvatore
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo Via Cintia 4, I-80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: isolation and structure elucidation of bioactive natural compounds from microorganisms and plants; chromatographic techniques; mass spectrometry; metabolomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A diverse array of natural compounds is involved in organisms’ interactions. During the associations, the interacting partners might be discernibly harmed or receive benefits. In particular, the relationship between plants and microbes is usually mediated by secondary metabolites. Most of these interactions are advantageous to plants, for their growth and development (e.g., mycorrhizae and endophytes). Some microbial species are able to break the balance of mutual benefit and become plant pathogens, producing a lot of compounds as virulence factors (e.g., phytotoxins). Plants defend themselves in response to microbial infections by synthetizing compounds, named phytoalexins, which have long been regarded for their antibiotic, antifungal, and insecticidal activities. The knowledge of plant–microbe interactions could be utilized for the development of efficient and sustainable strategies for the screening of producing compounds and for the agricultural potentials of secondary metabolites in crop protection. Researchers are warmly invited to submit research covering, but not limited to, the isolation, the chemical/biological characterization and the development of strategies for the screening of metabolites involved in plant–microbe interactions produced in vitro and in vivo.

Dr. Anna Andolfi
Dr. Maria Michela Salvatore
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biological activity
  • chemical structure elucidation
  • endophytes
  • metabolomics
  • phytoalexins
  • phytopatogens
  • phytotoxins
  • plant-microbe interactions

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Secondary Metabolite Differences between Naturally Grown and Conventional Coarse Green Tea
Agriculture 2020, 10(12), 632; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture10120632 - 14 Dec 2020
Viewed by 1679
Abstract
Crop culture conditions are one of the important interfaces between food, the environment, and health, and an essential research area for maintaining social-ecological integrity. In recent years, it has been reported that the difference in culture conditions between monoculture with external inputs ( [...] Read more.
Crop culture conditions are one of the important interfaces between food, the environment, and health, and an essential research area for maintaining social-ecological integrity. In recent years, it has been reported that the difference in culture conditions between monoculture with external inputs (in cultura) and self-organized ecological niches (in natura) is significant for the resulting physiological property of plants. It has also been suggested that there exist metabolic proxies in various foods that can separate these two culture conditions, which does not depend on a single component but on the distribution of various compounds. However, little has been studied in a time series of replicated production to quantify the reproducibility of these metabolomic features associated with culture conditions. In this study, we obtained metabolome data of coarse green tea (Camellia sinensis) grown in the same region in Japan under both in cultura and in natura culture conditions over the course of six years, and constructed a list of multiple components that separated the effects of culture conditions by statistical analysis, and estimated the metabolic functions of the compounds that contributed to the separation. The results suggest that naturally grown samples are rich in allelochemicals, such as phytochemicals, alkaloids, phenylpropanoids, steroids, as well as the compounds related to microorganisms and vitamin B6 that imply the interactions with the soil microbiome. The estimated physiological functions of the distinctive compounds suggest that the in natura crop production is not only beneficial with known properties of maintaining ecosystem health such as soil functions and pathogen control, but also for the augmentation of the plant secondary metabolites that support long-term health protective effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Metabolites in Plant-Microbe Interactions)
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Article
Development of a Solid Bioherbicide Formulation by Spray Drying Technology
Agriculture 2020, 10(6), 215; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture10060215 - 09 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 925
Abstract
This study aimed to compare the herbicidal activity of solid formulas obtained by spray drying with conventional liquid formulas containing biomolecules produced by submerged cultivation of the fungus Diaporthe sp. in a stirred-tank bioreactor. The solid formula presented the highest phytotoxicity on plant [...] Read more.
This study aimed to compare the herbicidal activity of solid formulas obtained by spray drying with conventional liquid formulas containing biomolecules produced by submerged cultivation of the fungus Diaporthe sp. in a stirred-tank bioreactor. The solid formula presented the highest phytotoxicity on plant control (96.7%) and the phytotoxicity was directly related to the concentration of fermented broth in the formula. The use of adjuvant improved the efficiency of the bioherbicide. Dry matters of treatments were lower than the control and this was correlated with an increase in oxidative stress, since the activity of the antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and guaiacol peroxidase increased in the treatment with a high level of phytotoxicity. Spray drying technology is a promising tool to concentrate bioherbicide without the loss of bioactive compounds since one of the major challenges in the production of bioherbicides is the low concentration of active ingredients in the fermented broth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Metabolites in Plant-Microbe Interactions)
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Article
Secondary Metabolites Produced by Macrophomina phaseolina Isolated from Eucalyptus globulus
Agriculture 2020, 10(3), 72; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture10030072 - 11 Mar 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2071
Abstract
In the course of investigations on the role of secondary metabolites in plant-microbe interactions, the production of secondary metabolites by Macrophomina phaseolina isolates from Eucalyptus globulus, was studied. This fungus is responsible for several plant diseases which affect crop productivity and industry. [...] Read more.
In the course of investigations on the role of secondary metabolites in plant-microbe interactions, the production of secondary metabolites by Macrophomina phaseolina isolates from Eucalyptus globulus, was studied. This fungus is responsible for several plant diseases which affect crop productivity and industry. Although secondary metabolites may play a role in disease development, there are very few reports on M. phaseolina metabolomics and, as far as we know, isolates from eucalypts have not been investigated for secondary metabolites production. In the present paper, metabolites typical of fungi, from the family Botryosphaeriaceae, were identified for the first time as products of M. phaseolina. Furthermore, the isolate under examination was grown in the presence and absence of host stem tissue, and metabolite profiles were compared. Five products are reported for the first time in this species and azelaic acid was exclusively produced in the presence of eucalypt stem. Finally, phytotoxicity and cytotoxicity tests of culture filtrates and crude organic extracts were also performed. Key Contribution: Lipophilic metabolites produced by M. phaseolina might play a role in the plant-fungus interactions responsible for serious diseases of E. globulus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Metabolites in Plant-Microbe Interactions)
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Review

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Review
Secondary Metabolites Produced by Neofusicoccum Species Associated with Plants: A Review
Agriculture 2021, 11(2), 149; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11020149 - 11 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 706
Abstract
The genus Neofusicoccum is comprised of approximately 50 species with a worldwide distribution and is typically associated with plants. Neofusicoccum is well-known for the diseases it causes on economically and ecologically relevant host plants. In particular, members of this genus are responsible for [...] Read more.
The genus Neofusicoccum is comprised of approximately 50 species with a worldwide distribution and is typically associated with plants. Neofusicoccum is well-known for the diseases it causes on economically and ecologically relevant host plants. In particular, members of this genus are responsible for grapevine diseases, such as leaf spots, fruit rots, shoot dieback, bud necrosis, vascular discoloration of the wood, and perennial cankers. Many secondary metabolites, including (−)-botryoisocoumarin A, botryosphaerones, cyclobotryoxide and isosclerone, were identified from species of Neofusicoccum and their structural variability and bioactivities might be associated with the role of these compounds in the fungal pathogenicity and virulence. In this review, we summarize the secondary metabolites from Neofusicoccum species focusing on the role of these compounds in the interaction between the fungus and host plant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Metabolites in Plant-Microbe Interactions)
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