Special Issue "Emerging Soil Pollutants: Detection, Risk Assessment, and Remediation"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Soils".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Helen Karasali
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Guest Editor
Benaki Phytopathological Institute, Department of Pesticides Control and Phytopharmacy, Laboratory of Chemical Control of Pesticides, 8 Stefanou Delta Street, Kifissia, 14561 Athens, Greece
Interests: pesticide residues soil and sediment; soil environmental chemistry; soil contamination and monitoring; pesticides; method validation; risk assessment; fate and behavior of pesticides in the environment; agricultural solid waste management
Dr. Evangelia Tzanetou
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Co-Guest Editor
Benaki Phytopathological Institute, Department of Pesticides Control and Phytopharmacy, Laboratory of Chemical Control of Pesticides, 8 Stefanou Delta Street, Kifissia, 14561 Athens, Greece
Interests: pesticide residues soil; pesticides; method validation; regulatory science; chromatography; mass spectrometry; contaminants; bioactive compounds

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil is a key element for human health as it is a critical source for primary production, renewal of water resources, recycling of nutrients, biodiversity, and other ecological and biogeochemical functions. It is a complex mixture of living organisms, minerals, organics, and other constituents. Soils are polluted by a wide range of sources. Some of the polluting constituents are well-known and treated by appropriate methodologies for soil management and remediation. Currently, countless emerging pollutants such as pesticides are detected in the environment including soils. Pesticides can be spread from soil to aquifers, thus, contaminating them. The lack of knowledge on their fate and transfer behavior represents a substantial challenge for soil and, consequently, land management.

The challenges posed by emerging contaminants in soils are crucial and require rigorous actions and collaboration. There is a need for monitoring data and risk assessment models, but also for awareness-raising and new guidelines and authority models to deal with emerging contaminants in soils. Detection of these contaminants in soil and sediment is particularly challenging due to the low detection limits required, their intricate nature, and the difficulty in separating these compounds from interfering.

This Special Issue is aimed at soliciting original contributions from academics, researchers, and other stakeholders providing data on the detection of monitoring soil quality as regards pesticide residues in different countries at regional, national, or continental scales. The editor encourages submissions with applications of innovative and/or novel methodologies to address the theme of the Special Issue. The scope of submission includes original research and review articles.

Dr. Helen Karasali
Dr. Evangelia Tzanetou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Soil
  • Pollutants
  • Pesticide residues
  • Monitoring data
  • Risk assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Dieldrin Case Study: Another Evidence of an Obsolete Substance in the European Soil Environment
Agriculture 2021, 11(4), 314; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11040314 - 03 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Soil constitutes a central environmental compartment that, due to natural and anthropogenic activities, is a recipient of several contaminants. Among them, organochlorine pesticides are of major concern, even though they have been banned decades ago in the European Union, due to their persistence [...] Read more.
Soil constitutes a central environmental compartment that, due to natural and anthropogenic activities, is a recipient of several contaminants. Among them, organochlorine pesticides are of major concern, even though they have been banned decades ago in the European Union, due to their persistence and the health effects they can elicit. In the presented work, a gas chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric (GC-MS/MS) developed method was applied to soil samples after the suspected and potential use of formulations containing organochlorine active substance. One soil sample was positive to dieldrin at 0.018 mg kg−1. Predicted environmental concentration in soil (PECsoil) considering a single application of this active substance potentially attributed the finding in its past use. The subsequent health risk assessment showed negligible non-carcinogenic risk and tolerable carcinogenic risk. The latter signifies that repetitive and prolonged sampling can unveil the pragmatic projection of persistent chemicals’ residues in the soil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Soil Pollutants: Detection, Risk Assessment, and Remediation)
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Review

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Review
Irrigation Induced Salinity and Sodicity Hazards on Soil and Groundwater: An Overview of Its Causes, Impacts and Mitigation Strategies
Agriculture 2021, 11(10), 983; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11100983 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 580
Abstract
Salinity and sodicity have been a major environmental hazard of the past century since more than 25% of the total land and 33% of the irrigated land globally are affected by salinity and sodicity. Adverse effects of soil salinity and sodicity include inhibited [...] Read more.
Salinity and sodicity have been a major environmental hazard of the past century since more than 25% of the total land and 33% of the irrigated land globally are affected by salinity and sodicity. Adverse effects of soil salinity and sodicity include inhibited crop growth, waterlogging issues, groundwater contamination, loss in soil fertility and other associated secondary impacts on dependent ecosystems. Salinity and sodicity also have an enormous impact on food security since a substantial portion of the world’s irrigated land is affected by them. While the intrinsic nature of the soil could cause soil salinity and sodicity, in developing countries, they are also primarily caused by unsustainable irrigation practices, such as using high volumes of fertilizers, irrigating with saline/sodic water and lack of adequate drainage facilities to drain surplus irrigated water. This has also caused irreversible groundwater contamination in many regions. Although several remediation techniques have been developed, comprehensive land reclamation still remains challenging and is often time and resource inefficient. Mitigating the risk of salinity and sodicity while continuing to irrigate the land, for example, by growing salt-resistant crops such as halophytes together with regular crops or creating artificial drainage appears to be the most practical solution as farmers cannot halt irrigation. The purpose of this review is to highlight the global prevalence of salinity and sodicity in irrigated areas, highlight their spatiotemporal variability and causes, document the effects of irrigation induced salinity and sodicity on physicochemical properties of soil and groundwater, and discuss practical, innovative, and feasible practices and solutions to mitigate the salinity and sodicity hazards on soil and groundwater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Soil Pollutants: Detection, Risk Assessment, and Remediation)
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