Special Issue "Women in Archaeology"

A special issue of Heritage (ISSN 2571-9408).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Asst. Prof. Dr. Julie Hoggarth
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Guest Editor
Department of Anthropology & Institute of Archaeology, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97173, Waco, TX 76798, USA
Interests: Maya archaeology; Bayesian radiocarbon chronologies; human-environment interactions; women in archaeology
Asst. Prof. Dr. Alicia Ventresca Miller
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Anthropology & Museum of Anthropological Archaeology, University of Michigan, 101 West Hall, 1085 S. University Ave. Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
Interests: Asian archaeology; isotopes; bioarchaeology; paleoproteomics; dietary transitions; social complexity

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

In the discipline of archaeology, women now make up a greater percentage than men (Lazar et al 2014; Peliska 2014). However, an ongoing trend is that a greater proportion of well-paid positions are held by men (Peliska 2014). Over the past five decades, studies aimed at understanding gender disparities in archaeology have highlighted discrepancies in hiring practices (Zeder 1997:2), publication rates (Gero 1985; Heath-Stout 2020), and grant success (Goldstein et al. 2018; Yellen 1991). Yet, the MeToo movement and its fallout at the 2019 Society for American Archaeology meetings demonstrates that the field still has much work to do to create equal, inclusive, and safe conditions for women in our field.

The global crisis sparked by the coronavirus pandemic has put a spotlight on the persistence of gender disparities across disciplines. On-going studies suggest that women are publishing less since the pandemic began, disproportionately impacting younger researchers (Viglione 2020) and women with young children (Myers et al. 2020). This crisis not only highlights gender disparities, but also major efforts towards building diversity in science. In this moment it is hard to gauge the specific effects of the pandemic on women and minority groups in archaeology.

The aim of this Special Issue is to offer a real-time perspective on the status of women in archaeology. We aim to explore the long-term issues that women in archaeology have faced across their careers while also highlighting recent impacts, such as the coronavirus pandemic. While submissions can explore a variety of experiences from women working in academia, CRM, museum studies, and other archaeology-related careers, papers should be grounded by the literature on the history of women in archaeology/anthropology (or related fields) and/or gender archaeology, and if appropriate include data that demonstrate large-scale trends (e.g., Heath-Stout 2020).

Submissions of papers from women in under-represented communities are especially welcomed. We anticipate that it might be difficult for women with increased childcare responsibilities to participate in this issue. In effort to include a diversity of perspectives, we are willing to pair up authors who have similar interests, backgrounds, or experiences, to spread out the workload across multiple individuals working on similar topics. If you are interested in participating in this issue, but are currently unable to do so due to childcare or other responsibilities, please consider signing up to collaborate with other women on a paper by contacting the guest editors. Contributors who are willing to allow women with similar interests to join their papers should also contact the editors as soon in the process as possible. Papers that are currently in preparation (and open to additional collaborators) are focused on:

1. The impacts of the coronavirus pandemic on women in archaeology in academia, CRM, and museums.
2. Opportunities for young women in archaeology.

The list of available topics will be updated as additional papers are proposed.

References:
Gero, J. M. (1985). Socio-politics and the woman-at-home ideology. American Antiquity 50(2):342-350.

Goldstein, L., Mills, B. J., Herr, S., Burkholder, J. E., Aiello, L., & Thornton, C. (2018). Why Do Fewer Women than Men Apply for Grants after Their PhDs?. American Antiquity, 83(3):367-386.

Heath-Stout, L. E. (2020). Gender, Equity, and the Peer Review Process at the Journal of Field Archaeology.  Journal of Field Archaeology 45:135-139.

Lazar, I., Kompare, T., van Londen, H., & Schenk, T. (2014). The Archaeologist of the Future is Likely to be a Woman: Age and Gender Patterns in European Archaeology. Archaeologies 10(3):257-280.

Myers, K. R., Tham, W. Y., Yin, Y., Cohodes, N., Thursby, J. G., Thursby, M. C., Schiffer, P., Walsh, J.T., Lakhani, K.R., and  Wang, D. (2020). Unequal effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on scientists. Nature Human Behaviour 1-4.  https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.1038/s41562-020-0921-y

Peliska, Charles J. (2014)  Survey for Field Archaeologists / Cultural Resource Managers. https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/iia/6 Accessed 09/02/2020.

VIglione, G. (2020) Are women publishing less during the pandemic? Here is what the data say. Nature 581:365-366.

Yellen, John (1991) Women, Archaeology, and NSF: An Analysis of Fiscal Year 1989 Data. In The Archaeology of Gender, edited by Wade, Dale and Willows, Noreen, pp. 201–210. University of Calgary Archaeological Association, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Zeder, M. A. (1997) The American archaeologist: a profile. Rowman Altamira. Walnut Creek, California.

Asst. Prof. Dr. Julie Hoggarth
Asst. Prof. Dr. Alicia Ventresca Miller
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Heritage is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Archaeology, The Academy, and Women: Finding One’s Own Path
Heritage 2021, 4(3), 1725-1736; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4030096 - 11 Aug 2021
Viewed by 377
Abstract
While women have long been key to archaeological research, the role of women and women’s voices have grown substantially in the last 50 years. Once predominantly found in the laboratory rather than in the field, women archaeologists are driving the discipline forward through [...] Read more.
While women have long been key to archaeological research, the role of women and women’s voices have grown substantially in the last 50 years. Once predominantly found in the laboratory rather than in the field, women archaeologists are driving the discipline forward through field work and analysis. Similar developments are taking place throughout higher education in both academics and in leadership. At the same time, work on the engendered past is also evolving. However, more needs to be done. Issues in the field, particularly injustices done toward women associated with fieldwork, are coming to the forefront, hopefully assuring a future with higher ethical standards. The personal stories of female archaeologists help provide context to the past as well as opportunities for the future of archaeology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Archaeology)
Article
Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Women and Early Career Archaeologists
Heritage 2021, 4(3), 1681-1702; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4030093 - 10 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2948
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has had far-reaching impacts in all segments of life worldwide. While a variety of surveys have assessed the impacts of the pandemic in other fields, few studies have focused on understanding the short- and long-term impacts of the pandemic for [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has had far-reaching impacts in all segments of life worldwide. While a variety of surveys have assessed the impacts of the pandemic in other fields, few studies have focused on understanding the short- and long-term impacts of the pandemic for archaeology. To assess these trends, we asked survey respondents (n = 570) if they experienced job loss and to rate the percentage of change in their economic situation, workload, teaching or research activities, and personal responsibilities. Results show alarming trends, with nearly half of those who experienced job loss being under the age of 35 and women and early career archaeologists suffering major economic losses. Impacts to workload, teaching activities, and research activities were also felt across these groups. Substantial increases in personal responsibilities (childcare, eldercare, caring for sick family members) were also identified, especially for women with children under 18 years of age. While structural inequalities have already been identified across different sectors of archaeology, the results of this survey suggest the most vulnerable populations are those most heavily affected. We recommend a variety of strategies for employers, professional organizations, funding agencies, and publishers to consider in mitigating the consequences of COVID-19, especially for women and early career scholars. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Archaeology)
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