Special Issue "Marine Pollutants"

A special issue of Pollutants (ISSN 2673-4672).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 5876

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesco Saliu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (DISAT), University of Milano-Bicocca, 120126 Milan, Italy
Interests: marine pollution; food chemistry; food contaminants; environmental analyses; analytical methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Paolo Galli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (DISAT), University of Milan – Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza, 20126 Milan, Italy
Interests: marine ecology; parasite ecology; polypropylenes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

This Special Issue entitled “marine pollutants” aims to provide an up-to-date and comprehensive view of the hazardous substances, materials and processes that can pose a risk to marine ecosystems and negatively affect the health and the economy of the communities living the coastal areas (i.e., fishing and tourism industry). All the types of marine pollution will be considered: from planetary scale issues such as like oceans acidification, warming and eutrophication to local scale impact such as like oil spills, chemical and biological contamination, underwater noise. Papers dealing with plastic and microplastic in the marine environment are also welcomed. The covered topics will span all the aspect of marine pollution: occurrence, fate and bio-ecological effects of the marine pollutants; impacts on fishing and aquaculture, analytical methods and monitoring techniques; mitigation and remediation strategies; green technologies and blue economy, law and policies. The target audience includes the whole science community, industry, conservation groups, concerned citizens and policy makers devoted to implement effective pollution control strategies. We would like to encourage you to submit to this Special Issue your original research papers, short communication of preliminary results, review articles or commentaries to stimulate the discussion. 

Dr. Francesco Saliu
Prof. Paolo Galli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pollutants is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Marine pollution
  • Marine debris
  • Organic pollutants
  • Microplastic
  • Ocean warming
  • Ocean acidification
  • Biological contamination

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Marine Litter Stormy Wash-Outs: Developing the Neural Network to Predict Them
Pollutants 2021, 1(3), 156-168; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pollutants1030013 - 10 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1072
Abstract
Observations show that after stormy events, anthropogenic litter is washed ashore for short periods of time, providing the opportunity to collect and remove it from the environment. However, water dynamics in sea coastal zones during and after storms are very complicated, and the [...] Read more.
Observations show that after stormy events, anthropogenic litter is washed ashore for short periods of time, providing the opportunity to collect and remove it from the environment. However, water dynamics in sea coastal zones during and after storms are very complicated, and the transport properties of litter items are very diverse; thus, predicting litter wash-outs using classical numerical models is challenging. We analyze meteorological and hydrophysical conditions in the Baltic Sea coastal zone to further use the obtained data as a training sequence for an artificial neural network (ANN). Analysis of the physical processes behind large litter wash-outs links open-source meteorological (wind speed and direction) and hydrodynamic reanalysis (surface wave parameters) data to the time and location of these wash-outs. A detailed analysis of 25 cases of wash-outs observed at the shore of the Sambian Peninsula was performed. The importance of the duration of the storm and its subsiding phase was revealed. An ANN structure is proposed for forecasting marine debris wash-outs as the first step in the creation of a neural network-based tool for managers and beach cleaners, helping to plan effective measures to remove plastics and other anthropogenic contaminants from the marine environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Pollutants)
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Review

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Review
Microplastics in the Aquatic Environment—The Occurrence, Sources, Ecological Impacts, Fate, and Remediation Challenges
Pollutants 2021, 1(2), 95-118; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pollutants1020009 - 18 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1604
Abstract
Microplastics are discharged into the environment through human activities and are persistent in the environment. With the prevalent use of plastic-based personal protective equipment in the prevention of the spread of the COVID-19 virus, the concentration of microplastics in the environment is envisaged [...] Read more.
Microplastics are discharged into the environment through human activities and are persistent in the environment. With the prevalent use of plastic-based personal protective equipment in the prevention of the spread of the COVID-19 virus, the concentration of microplastics in the environment is envisaged to increase. Potential ecological and health risks emanate from their potential to adsorb and transport toxic chemicals, and ease of absorption into the cells of living organisms and interfering with physiological processes. This review (1) discusses sources and pathways through which microplastics enter the environment, (2) evaluates the fate and behavior of microplastics, (3) discusses microplastics in African aquatic systems, and (4) identifies research gaps and recommends remediation strategies. Importantly, while there is significant microplastics pollution in the aquatic environment, pollution in terrestrial systems are not widely studied. Besides, there is a dearth of information on microplastics in African aquatic systems. The paper recommends that the governments and non-governmental organizations should fund research to address knowledge gaps, which include: (1) the environmental fate of microplastics, (2) conducting toxicological studies under environmentally relevant conditions, (3) investigating toxicity mechanisms to biota, and developing mitigation measures to safeguard human health, and (4) investigating pollutants transported by microplastics. Moreover, regulatory measures, along with the circular economy strategies, may help reduce microplastic pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Pollutants)
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Other

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Commentary
The Mauritius Oil Spill: What’s Next?
Pollutants 2021, 1(1), 18-28; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pollutants1010003 - 02 Feb 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2582
Abstract
In light of the recent marine oil spill that occurred off the coast of Mauritius (Indian Ocean), we comment here the incident, the containment method used by the local population, the biological impact of oil spill on two sensitive tropical marine ecosystems (coral [...] Read more.
In light of the recent marine oil spill that occurred off the coast of Mauritius (Indian Ocean), we comment here the incident, the containment method used by the local population, the biological impact of oil spill on two sensitive tropical marine ecosystems (coral reefs and mangrove forests), and we suggest monitoring and restoration techniques of the impacted ecosystems based on recent research advancements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Pollutants)
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