Special Issue "Futsal - From Training to Competition"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Bruno Travassos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport Sciences, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal; CIDESD – Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: performance analysis in team sports; decision-making process; training periodization; talent development; futsal
Dr. Fabio Nakamura
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Physical Education UPE/UFPB, Joao Pessoa, PB, Brasil
Interests: physiology; exercise; athletes; physical training; conditioning; training adaptation; monitoring; sport science; performance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Fabio Serpiello
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Victoria University, College of Sports and Exercise Science, Institute for Health and Sport
Interests: futsal; football; intermittent exercise; youth development; physiology; physical and tactical match analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Futsal is an emergent sport worldwide. However, little research has been developed with the goal of characterizing physical, technical, and tactical game demands or of monitoring training adaptations and their transfer to the context of performance. Additionally, very few studies have dedicated their efforts to understanding the learning process and the possible routes for futsal players’ development. Furthermore, the emerging technological advances and the possibility to capture positional data indoors opens new venues to the development of original and applied research with implications for performance analysis and training periodization in futsal.

Therefore, this Special Issue opens the possibility to publish original research, meta-analyses, reviews, and case studies related to the training process and performance analysis in futsal. This Special Issue seeks contributions on a variety of topics related to futsal: (i) talent development; (ii) futsal skills tests; (iii) training monitoring and testing; (iv) training periodization; (v) performance analysis; (vi) manipulation of practice tasks; (vii) game characterization; (viii) coaching process.

Dr. Bruno Travassos
Dr. Fabio Nakamura
Dr. Fabio Serpiello
Dr. Miguel Ángel Gómez-Ruano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • futsal
  • performance analysis
  • match analysis
  • tactical behaviour
  • monitoring and testing
  • physical training
  • training adaptations
  • small-sided games
  • pedagogy and teaching
  • player development

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Effect of Traditional and Stabilization-Oriented Exercises on Deep Stabilization System Function in Elite Futsal Players
Sports 2020, 8(12), 153; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sports8120153 - 28 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1217
Abstract
Background: This study aimed to compare the effect of traditional and stability-oriented strength exercises on trunk stability and deep stabilization system (DSS) activation in elite futsal players. Methods: Twenty elite futsal players (21–34 years, 180 ± 13 cm, 79 ± 15 kg) were [...] Read more.
Background: This study aimed to compare the effect of traditional and stability-oriented strength exercises on trunk stability and deep stabilization system (DSS) activation in elite futsal players. Methods: Twenty elite futsal players (21–34 years, 180 ± 13 cm, 79 ± 15 kg) were randomly divided into a group that performed stability-oriented exercises and a group that performed traditional strength exercises. Both interventions lasted for 10 weeks and included 25 strength training sessions. Main outcome measures: The DSS pretest and posttest included the diaphragm test, trunk flexion test, back extension test, hip flexion test, intraabdominal pressure test, and a side plank test on a 1–5 point scale. Results: Both groups had similar initial test results, where the stability-oriented exercise group had significantly improved intraabdominal pressure test (p = 0.004, by lower quartile rate), trunk flexion (p = 0.036, by 0.5 grade in median), and side plank (p = 0.002, by 1 grade in median) in posttest results. Traditional exercise did not change the results of any of the included DSS function tests. Conclusions: Stabilization-oriented exercises effectively activate the functions of the DSS and should be prioritized over traditional strength exercises in injury prevention training programs. The use of stabilization-oriented exercises might prevent injury and overloading in elite futsal players. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Futsal - From Training to Competition)
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Article
Effects of Low-Moderate Load High-Velocity Resistance Training on Physical Performance of Under-20 Futsal Players
Sports 2019, 7(3), 69; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sports7030069 - 18 Mar 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2418
Abstract
Resistance training (RT) is an effective methodology to improve physical performance of athletes. However, up to now, no studies have addressed the RT benefits in under-20 futsal players. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of six weeks of RT [...] Read more.
Resistance training (RT) is an effective methodology to improve physical performance of athletes. However, up to now, no studies have addressed the RT benefits in under-20 futsal players. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of six weeks of RT with high-velocity movements, low-to-moderate loads, and low volume on physical performance of under-20 futsal players. A total of 21 players were divided into two groups: A control group (CG, n = 10) and a RT group (RTG, n = 11). The RTG performed two weekly training sessions constituted by leg-press, jumps, and sprints, along with three futsal training sessions, while the CG only performed the futsal training. Before and after the intervention, the sprint time in 0–10 m (T10), 10–20 m (T10–20), and 0–20 m (T20), the countermovement jump (CMJ) height, the T-Test time, the kicking ball speed (KBS), and the maximum dynamic strength in the leg-press, were assessed. In post-test, significant improvements in CMJ, T-Test, KBS, and leg-press were found for the RTG, whilst a significant decrease in T10–20 was evidenced in the CG. The present results suggested that RT based on high velocity movements, low-to-moderate loads, and low volume produce positive effects on physical performance of under-20 futsal players. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Futsal - From Training to Competition)
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Article
Different Pathways Leading up to the Same Futsal Competition: Individual and Inter-Team Variability in Loading Patterns and Preseason Training Adaptations
Sports 2019, 7(1), 7; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sports7010007 - 28 Dec 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1569
Abstract
During the preseason, futsal players deal with large internal load, which may result in a reduction in physical performance. The aims of this study were to compare the session rating of perceived exertion training load (s-RPE TL) during the preseason between two teams; [...] Read more.
During the preseason, futsal players deal with large internal load, which may result in a reduction in physical performance. The aims of this study were to compare the session rating of perceived exertion training load (s-RPE TL) during the preseason between two teams; and to analyze the changes on the delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), aerobic- and speed-power characteristics in players accumulating different s-RPE TL (Low (LTL) vs. High (HTL)). Twenty-eight players (Team A, n = 15; Team B, n = 13) were recruited. The s-RPE TL was monitored throughout the preseason phase (five weeks) in both teams. The coaches of each team planned the activities that comprised their training programs, without any interference from the researchers. Team A evaluated countermovement jumps (CMJ) and DOMS weekly. Team B performed squat jumps (SJ), CMJ, 5 m and 15 m sprints, and a futsal intermittent endurance test (PVFIET) before and after the preseason. Team B accumulated an almost-certainly greater s-RPE TL than Team A. In Team A, the CMJ height was likely to almost certainly improved for the HTL group from week 3. In Team B, the 5 m and 15 m sprint likely decreased after the preseason. Changes in 5 m (r = −0.61) and 15 m (r = −0.56) were correlated with total s-RPE TL. Changes in PVFIET were positively associated with changes in sprint, but inversely related to the baseline. s-RPE TL differed between both teams, and substantial gains in neuromuscular performance were observed for the HTL group in Team A. Slower and faster players in Team B showed distinct intermittent-endurance and speed adaptive responses during the high-volume preseason. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Futsal - From Training to Competition)
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