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Review

Bacterial Persister-Cells and Spores in the Food Chain: Their Potential Inactivation by Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs)

by 1, 1,*,† and 2,†
1
Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, Department of Molecular Biology and Microbial Food Safety, University of Amsterdam, 1098 XH Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
Department of Medical Microbiology, Centre for Infection and Immunity Amsterdam (CINIMA), Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Equal contribution.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(23), 8967; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21238967
Received: 30 October 2020 / Revised: 23 November 2020 / Accepted: 24 November 2020 / Published: 27 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Peptides for Health Benefits 2020)
The occurrence of bacterial pathogens in the food chain has caused a severe impact on public health and welfare in both developing and developed countries. Moreover, the existence of antimicrobial-tolerant persisting morphotypes of these pathogens including both persister-cells as well as bacterial spores contributes to difficulty in elimination and in recurrent infection. Therefore, comprehensive understanding of the behavior of these persisting bacterial forms in their environmental niche and upon infection of humans is necessary. Since traditional antimicrobials fail to kill persisters and spores due to their (extremely) low metabolic activities, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been intensively investigated as one of the most promising strategies against these persisting bacterial forms, showing high efficacy of inactivation. In addition, AMP-based foodborne pathogen detection and prevention of infection has made significant progress. This review focuses on recent research on common bacterial pathogens in the food chain, their persisting morphotypes, and on AMP-based solutions. Challenges in research and application of AMPs are described. View Full-Text
Keywords: foodborne pathogen; persisters; bacterial spores; antimicrobial peptides foodborne pathogen; persisters; bacterial spores; antimicrobial peptides
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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, S.; Brul, S.; Zaat, S.A.J. Bacterial Persister-Cells and Spores in the Food Chain: Their Potential Inactivation by Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs). Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 8967. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21238967

AMA Style

Liu S, Brul S, Zaat SAJ. Bacterial Persister-Cells and Spores in the Food Chain: Their Potential Inactivation by Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs). International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(23):8967. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21238967

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liu, Shiqi, Stanley Brul, and Sebastian A.J. Zaat 2020. "Bacterial Persister-Cells and Spores in the Food Chain: Their Potential Inactivation by Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs)" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 23: 8967. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21238967

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