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Article

The Prevalence of Burnout and Its Associations with Psychosocial Work Environment among Kaunas Region (Lithuania) Hospitals’ Physicians

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Public Health Faculty, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas 47181, Lithuania
2
Health Research Institute, Faculty of Public Health, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas 47181, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3739; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103739
Received: 1 May 2020 / Revised: 17 May 2020 / Accepted: 22 May 2020 / Published: 25 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention of Occupational Risks)
The primary prevention of occupational burnout should be considered as a public health priority worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of burnout and its associations with the work environment among hospital physicians in the Kaunas region, Lithuania. The cross-sectional study was carried out in 2018. The Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) and the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI) were administered to examine occupational stress and personal, work-related, and client-related burnout among 647 physicians. Logistic regression analysis was applied to determine the association between dependent variable burnout and psychosocial environment among physicians, adjusting for potential confounders of age and gender. The prevalence rate of client-related, work-related, and personal burnout was 35.1%, 46.7%, and 44.8%, respectively. High job control, lack of supervisor, coworker support, job demands, and job insecurity were significantly associated with all three sub-dimensions of burnout. High job demands increased the probability of all three burnout dimensions, high job control reduced the probability of work-related, and client-related burnout and high job insecurity increased the probability of client-related burnout. The confirmed associations suggest that optimization of job demands and job control and the improvement of job security would be effective preventive measures in reducing occupational burnout among physicians. View Full-Text
Keywords: occupational stress; burnout; psychosocial risk; prevalence; physician occupational stress; burnout; psychosocial risk; prevalence; physician
MDPI and ACS Style

Žutautienė, R.; Radišauskas, R.; Kaliniene, G.; Ustinaviciene, R. The Prevalence of Burnout and Its Associations with Psychosocial Work Environment among Kaunas Region (Lithuania) Hospitals’ Physicians. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3739. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103739

AMA Style

Žutautienė R, Radišauskas R, Kaliniene G, Ustinaviciene R. The Prevalence of Burnout and Its Associations with Psychosocial Work Environment among Kaunas Region (Lithuania) Hospitals’ Physicians. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(10):3739. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103739

Chicago/Turabian Style

Žutautienė, Rasa, Ričardas Radišauskas, Gintare Kaliniene, and Ruta Ustinaviciene. 2020. "The Prevalence of Burnout and Its Associations with Psychosocial Work Environment among Kaunas Region (Lithuania) Hospitals’ Physicians" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 10: 3739. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103739

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