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Article

Helping Mothers and Daughters Talk about Environmental Breast Cancer Risk and Risk-Reducing Lifestyle Behaviors

1
UF Health Cancer Center, College of Journalism and Communications, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118400, Gainesville, FL 32611-8400, USA
2
Department of Communication, George Mason University, 4400 University, Dr, MSN3D6, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA
3
NORC at the University of Chicago, 4350 East West Highway, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
4
Fors Marsh Group, 901 N. Glebe Road, Arlington, VA 22201, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4757; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17134757
Received: 13 May 2020 / Revised: 22 June 2020 / Accepted: 28 June 2020 / Published: 2 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Communication and Public Health)
Background: Mothers and daughters struggle to talk about breast cancer risk. Even less attention is paid to environmental determinants of cancer. Third-party online approaches can be helpful navigating these conversations. The aim of this study was to obtain feedback from mothers exposed to a social media intervention (“mommy bloggers”) and identify their preferences for message-design approaches that could help them talk to their daughter(s) about environmental breast cancer risk. Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 50 mothers. A thematic analysis was conducted using the constant comparative method. Results: Mothers identified four approaches to message design that could help facilitate mother–daughter communication about environmental breast cancer risk. These included two action-oriented approaches that centered on getting the conversation started and keeping the conversation going and two approaches based on lifespan factors to promote daughters’ engagement by using age-appropriate language and visuals and focusing on developmentally specific lifestyle behaviors. Mothers also provided recommended strategies within each approach. Conclusions: Mothers identified various approaches interventionists can utilize to overcome barriers to talking to daughters about environmental breast cancer risk. To promote mother–daughter communication, the messages should be action-oriented to facilitate interaction, but also developed with lifespan and developmental considerations in mind to engage daughters. View Full-Text
Keywords: breast cancer; environmental risk; interpersonal communication; mother–daughter communication; social media; intervention; lifespan breast cancer; environmental risk; interpersonal communication; mother–daughter communication; social media; intervention; lifespan
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fisher, C.L.; Wright, K.B.; Rising, C.J.; Cai, X.; Mullis, M.D.; Burke-Garcia, A.; Afanaseva, D. Helping Mothers and Daughters Talk about Environmental Breast Cancer Risk and Risk-Reducing Lifestyle Behaviors. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4757. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17134757

AMA Style

Fisher CL, Wright KB, Rising CJ, Cai X, Mullis MD, Burke-Garcia A, Afanaseva D. Helping Mothers and Daughters Talk about Environmental Breast Cancer Risk and Risk-Reducing Lifestyle Behaviors. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(13):4757. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17134757

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fisher, Carla L., Kevin B. Wright, Camella J. Rising, Xiaomei Cai, Michaela D. Mullis, Amelia Burke-Garcia, and Dasha Afanaseva. 2020. "Helping Mothers and Daughters Talk about Environmental Breast Cancer Risk and Risk-Reducing Lifestyle Behaviors" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 13: 4757. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17134757

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