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Article

SettleIN: Using a Manualised Intervention to Facilitate the Adjustment of Older Adults with Dementia Following Placement into Residential Care

1
Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, 1-19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 7HB, UK
2
Wolfson Centre for Age Related Diseases, Kings College London, Wolfson Wing, Hodgkin Building, Guys Campus, London SE1 1UL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2606; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072606
Received: 22 February 2020 / Revised: 6 April 2020 / Accepted: 7 April 2020 / Published: 10 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enhancing the Quality of Care in Long-Term Care Settings)
The authors examined the feasibility of delivering an adapted version of SettleIN, a manualised staff-led programme designed to facilitate adjustment to care for new residents with dementia. The effects of SettleIN on resident adjustment, mood and quality of life were also investigated. A pilot randomised controlled trial was conducted. Nineteen new residents with dementia and 21 staff participants were recruited. Residents were randomly assigned to receive the SettleIN programme or residential care as usual. Resident quality of life, mood and overall adjustment were measured at baseline and post-intervention, in week seven. Interviews were conducted with staff in week seven to explore intervention feasibility. Despite medium to large effect sizes, there was no significant difference in mean change scores between the two conditions, with regards to quality of life, psychological wellbeing or overall adjustment outcomes. Qualitative feedback indicated that SettleIN was not feasible across all areas, with problems around recruitment and practicality. However, SettleIN was deemed feasible in terms of retention and acceptability among staff. The majority of staff felt that SettleIN was beneficial for residents but that organisational and programme factors impacted upon intervention feasibility. Further exploration of organisational barriers is needed in order to reduce the impact of such factors on care home research. View Full-Text
Keywords: dementia; adjustment; residential care; psychological wellbeing; staff training; quality of life dementia; adjustment; residential care; psychological wellbeing; staff training; quality of life
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MDPI and ACS Style

Saint-Bryant, C.A.; Murrill, J.; Hayward, J.K.; Nunez, K.-M.; Spector, A. SettleIN: Using a Manualised Intervention to Facilitate the Adjustment of Older Adults with Dementia Following Placement into Residential Care. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2606. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072606

AMA Style

Saint-Bryant CA, Murrill J, Hayward JK, Nunez K-M, Spector A. SettleIN: Using a Manualised Intervention to Facilitate the Adjustment of Older Adults with Dementia Following Placement into Residential Care. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(7):2606. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072606

Chicago/Turabian Style

Saint-Bryant, Caroline A.; Murrill, Judy; Hayward, Janine K.; Nunez, Kayleigh-Marie; Spector, Aimee. 2020. "SettleIN: Using a Manualised Intervention to Facilitate the Adjustment of Older Adults with Dementia Following Placement into Residential Care" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 7: 2606. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072606

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