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Article

Burnout, Reasons for Living and Dehumanisation among Italian Penitentiary Police Officers

1
FISPPA Department, University of Padova, 35139 Padova, Italy
2
Emili Sagol Creative Arts Therapies Research Center, University of Haifa, Haifa 349883, Israel
3
European and Mediterranean Cultures (DiCEM) Department, University of Basilicata, 75100 Matera, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3117; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093117
Received: 5 March 2020 / Revised: 25 April 2020 / Accepted: 27 April 2020 / Published: 30 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health Psychology)
The literature on burnout syndrome among Penitentiary Police Officers (PPOs) is still rather scarce, and there are no analyses on the protective factors that can prevent these workers from the dangerous effect of burnout, with respect to the weakening of the reasons for living and de-humanization. This study aimed to examine the relationships between burnout, protective factors against weakening of the reasons for living and not desiring to die and the role of de-humanisation, utilising the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI); the Reasons for Living Inventory (RFL); the Testoni Death Representation Scale (TDRS); and the Human Traits Attribution Scale (HTAS), involving 86 PPOs in a North Italy prison. Results showed the presence of a high level of burnout in the group of participants. In addition, dehumanization of prisoners, which is considered a factor that could help in managing other health professional stress situations, does not reduce the level of burnout. View Full-Text
Keywords: prison; penitentiary police officer (PPO); burnout syndrome; reasons for living; de-humanisation; workplace well-being prison; penitentiary police officer (PPO); burnout syndrome; reasons for living; de-humanisation; workplace well-being
MDPI and ACS Style

Testoni, I.; Nencioni, I.; Ronconi, L.; Alemanno, F.; Zamperini, A. Burnout, Reasons for Living and Dehumanisation among Italian Penitentiary Police Officers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3117. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093117

AMA Style

Testoni I, Nencioni I, Ronconi L, Alemanno F, Zamperini A. Burnout, Reasons for Living and Dehumanisation among Italian Penitentiary Police Officers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(9):3117. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093117

Chicago/Turabian Style

Testoni, Ines, Irene Nencioni, Lucia Ronconi, Francesca Alemanno, and Adriano Zamperini. 2020. "Burnout, Reasons for Living and Dehumanisation among Italian Penitentiary Police Officers" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 9: 3117. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093117

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