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Article

Impact of the COVID-19 Italian Lockdown on the Physiological and Psychological Well-Being of Children with Fragile X Syndrome and Their Families

1
Department of Developmental Psychology and Socialization, University of Padova, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padova, Italy
2
Molecular Genetics of Neurodevelopment, Department of Woman and Child Health, University of Padova, Via Giustiniani 3, 35128 Padova, Italy
3
Fondazione Istituto di Ricerca Pediatrica (IRP), Città Della Speranza, Corso Stati Uniti 4/F, 35127 Padova, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5752; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115752
Received: 14 April 2021 / Revised: 19 May 2021 / Accepted: 26 May 2021 / Published: 27 May 2021
On 10 March 2020, in Italy, a total lockdown was put in place to limit viral transmission of COVID-19 infection as much as possible. Research on the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted detrimental effects in children and their parents. However, little is known about such effects in children with neurodevelopment disorders and their caregivers. The present study investigated how the lockdown has impacted the physiological and psychological well-being of children with Fragile X-Syndrome (FXS), aged from 2 to 16 years, and their mothers. In an online survey, 48 mothers of FXS children reported their perception of self-efficacy as caregivers and, at the same time, their children’s sleep habits, behavioral and emotional difficulties during, and retrospectively, before the lockdown. Results showed a general worsening of sleep quality, and increasing behavioral problems. Although mothers reported a reduction in external support, their perception of self-efficacy as caregivers did not change during the home confinement compared to the period before. Overall, the present study suggested that specific interventions to manage sleep problems, as well as specific therapeutic and social support for increasing children and mother psychological well-being, need to be in place to mitigate the long-term effects of a lockdown. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; children with fragile-X syndrome; lockdown effects; sleep problems; psychological well-being; parental self-efficacy COVID-19; children with fragile-X syndrome; lockdown effects; sleep problems; psychological well-being; parental self-efficacy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Di Giorgio, E.; Polli, R.; Lunghi, M.; Murgia, A. Impact of the COVID-19 Italian Lockdown on the Physiological and Psychological Well-Being of Children with Fragile X Syndrome and Their Families. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 5752. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115752

AMA Style

Di Giorgio E, Polli R, Lunghi M, Murgia A. Impact of the COVID-19 Italian Lockdown on the Physiological and Psychological Well-Being of Children with Fragile X Syndrome and Their Families. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(11):5752. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115752

Chicago/Turabian Style

Di Giorgio, Elisa, Roberta Polli, Marco Lunghi, and Alessandra Murgia. 2021. "Impact of the COVID-19 Italian Lockdown on the Physiological and Psychological Well-Being of Children with Fragile X Syndrome and Their Families" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 11: 5752. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115752

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