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Article

Thriving from Work: Conceptualization and Measurement

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Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215, USA
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Departments of Orthopedic Surgery and Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Survey and Qualitative Methods Core, Division of Population Health, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215, USA
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Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7196; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137196
Received: 27 May 2021 / Revised: 21 June 2021 / Accepted: 29 June 2021 / Published: 5 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Worker Safety, Health, and Well-Being in the USA)
Work is a major contributor to our health and well-being. Workers’ thriving is directly influenced by their job design, work environment and organization. The purpose of this report is to describe the qualitative methods used to develop the candidate items for a novel measure of Thriving from Work through a multi-step iterative process including: a literature review, workshop, interviews with experts, and cognitive testing of the candidate items. Through this process, we defined Thriving from Work as the state of positive mental, physical, and social functioning in which workers’ experiences of their work and working conditions enable them to thrive in their overall lives, contributing to their ability to achieve their full potential in their work, home, and community. Thriving from Work was conceptualized into 37 attributes across seven dimensions: psychological, emotional, social, work–life integration, basic needs, experience of work, and health. We ultimately identified, developed and/or modified 87 candidate questionnaire items mapped to these attributes that performed well in cognitive testing in demographically and occupationally diverse workers. The Thriving from Work Questionnaire will be subjected to psychometric testing and item reduction in future studies. Individual items demonstrated face validity and good cognitive response properties and may be used independently from the questionnaire. View Full-Text
Keywords: total worker health; healthy work design and well-being; flourishing; questionnaire design; survey design; cognitive interviewing; measurement of well-being; thriving; worker well-being; worker thriving total worker health; healthy work design and well-being; flourishing; questionnaire design; survey design; cognitive interviewing; measurement of well-being; thriving; worker well-being; worker thriving
MDPI and ACS Style

Peters, S.E.; Sorensen, G.; Katz, J.N.; Gundersen, D.A.; Wagner, G.R. Thriving from Work: Conceptualization and Measurement. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7196. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137196

AMA Style

Peters SE, Sorensen G, Katz JN, Gundersen DA, Wagner GR. Thriving from Work: Conceptualization and Measurement. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(13):7196. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137196

Chicago/Turabian Style

Peters, Susan E., Glorian Sorensen, Jeffrey N. Katz, Daniel A. Gundersen, and Gregory R. Wagner 2021. "Thriving from Work: Conceptualization and Measurement" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 13: 7196. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137196

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