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Article

Characterization of LysBC17, a Lytic Endopeptidase from Bacillus cereus

1
USDA, Agricultural Research Service, BARC, Animal Biosciences and Biotechnology Laboratory, Baltimore Ave., Beltsville, MD 10300, USA
2
ContraFect Corporation, Yonkers, NY 10701, USA
3
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
4
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
5
RenOVAte Biosciences Inc., Reisterstown, MD 21136, USA
6
College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 August 2019 / Revised: 16 September 2019 / Accepted: 17 September 2019 / Published: 19 September 2019
Bacillus cereus, a Gram-positive bacterium, is an agent of food poisoning. B. cereus is closely related to Bacillus anthracis, a deadly pathogen for humans, and Bacillus thuringenesis, an insect pathogen. Due to the growing prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, alternative antimicrobials are needed. One such alternative is peptidoglycan hydrolase enzymes, which can lyse Gram-positive bacteria when exposed externally. A bioinformatic search for bacteriolytic enzymes led to the discovery of a gene encoding an endolysin-like endopeptidase, LysBC17, which was then cloned from the genome of B. cereus strain Bc17. This gene is also present in the B. cereus ATCC 14579 genome. The gene for LysBC17 encodes a protein of 281 amino acids. Recombinant LysBC17 was expressed and purified from E. coli. Optimal lytic activity against B. cereus occurred between pH 7.0 and 8.0, and in the absence of NaCl. The LysBC17 enzyme had lytic activity against strains of B. cereus, B. anthracis, and other Bacillus species. View Full-Text
Keywords: peptidoglycan hydrolase; endopeptidase; endolysin; autolysin; Bacillus cereus; Bacillus anthracis peptidoglycan hydrolase; endopeptidase; endolysin; autolysin; Bacillus cereus; Bacillus anthracis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Swift, S.M.; Etobayeva, I.V.; Reid, K.P.; Waters, J.J.; Oakley, B.B.; Donovan, D.M.; Nelson, D.C. Characterization of LysBC17, a Lytic Endopeptidase from Bacillus cereus. Antibiotics 2019, 8, 155. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics8030155

AMA Style

Swift SM, Etobayeva IV, Reid KP, Waters JJ, Oakley BB, Donovan DM, Nelson DC. Characterization of LysBC17, a Lytic Endopeptidase from Bacillus cereus. Antibiotics. 2019; 8(3):155. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics8030155

Chicago/Turabian Style

Swift, Steven M.; Etobayeva, Irina V.; Reid, Kevin P.; Waters, Jerel J.; Oakley, Brian B.; Donovan, David M.; Nelson, Daniel C. 2019. "Characterization of LysBC17, a Lytic Endopeptidase from Bacillus cereus" Antibiotics 8, no. 3: 155. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics8030155

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