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Article

Extubation Readiness in Preterm Infants: Evaluating the Role of Monitoring Intermittent Hypoxemia

1
Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40508, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics, McLaren Regional Medical Center, Flint, MI 48532, USA
3
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
4
Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
5
Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vineet Bhandari
Received: 13 February 2021 / Revised: 3 March 2021 / Accepted: 10 March 2021 / Published: 18 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neonatal Respiratory Distress)
Preterm infants with respiratory distress may require mechanical ventilation which is associated with increased pulmonary morbidities. Prompt and successful extubation to noninvasive support is a pressing goal. In this communication, we show original data that increased recurring intermittent hypoxemia (IH, oxygen saturation <80%) may be associated with extubation failure at 72 h in a cohort of neonates <30 weeks gestational age. Current-generation bedside high-resolution pulse oximeters provide saturation profiles that may be of use in identifying extubation readiness and failure. A larger prospective study that utilizes intermittent hypoxemia as an adjunct predictor for extubation readiness is warranted. View Full-Text
Keywords: extubation; intubation; intermittent hypoxemia; preterm; respiratory distress extubation; intubation; intermittent hypoxemia; preterm; respiratory distress
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MDPI and ACS Style

Abu Jawdeh, E.G.; Pant, A.; Gabrani, A.; Cunningham, M.D.; Raffay, T.M.; Westgate, P.M. Extubation Readiness in Preterm Infants: Evaluating the Role of Monitoring Intermittent Hypoxemia. Children 2021, 8, 237. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8030237

AMA Style

Abu Jawdeh EG, Pant A, Gabrani A, Cunningham MD, Raffay TM, Westgate PM. Extubation Readiness in Preterm Infants: Evaluating the Role of Monitoring Intermittent Hypoxemia. Children. 2021; 8(3):237. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8030237

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abu Jawdeh, Elie G., Amrita Pant, Aayush Gabrani, M. D. Cunningham, Thomas M. Raffay, and Philip M. Westgate 2021. "Extubation Readiness in Preterm Infants: Evaluating the Role of Monitoring Intermittent Hypoxemia" Children 8, no. 3: 237. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8030237

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