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Article

Extension of the Upper Yellow River into the Tibet Plateau: Review and New Data

1
School of Geography and Ocean Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023, China
2
Department of Earth Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Pierre Antoine
Received: 8 February 2021 / Revised: 8 April 2021 / Accepted: 20 April 2021 / Published: 25 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluvial Archives: Climatic and Topographical Influences)
The Wufo Basin at the margin of the northeastern Tibet Plateau connects the upstream reaches of the Yellow River with the lowland catchment downstream, and the fluvial terrace sequence in this basin provides crucial clues to understand the evolution history of the Yellow River drainage system in relation to the uplift and outgrowth of the Tibetan Plateau. Using field survey and analysis of Digital Elevation Model/Google Earth imagery, we found at least eight Yellow River terraces in this area. The overlying loess of the highest terrace was dated at 1.2 Ma based on paleomagnetic stratigraphy (two normal and two reversal polarities) and the loess-paleosol sequence (12 loess-paleosol cycles). This terrace shows the connections of drainage parts in and outside the Tibetan Plateau through its NE margin. In addition, we review the previously published data on the Yellow River terraces and ancient large lakes in the basins. Based on our new data and previous researches, we conclude that the modern Yellow River, with headwaters in the Tibet Plateau and debouching in the Bohai Sea, should date from at least 1.2 Ma. Ancient large lakes (such as the Hetao and Sanmen Lakes) developed as exorheic systems and flowed through the modern Yellow River at that time. View Full-Text
Keywords: terraces; loess-paleosol sequence; Yellow River; magneto-stratigraphy; Northeastern Tibet Plateau terraces; loess-paleosol sequence; Yellow River; magneto-stratigraphy; Northeastern Tibet Plateau
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, Z.; Wang, X.; Vandenberghe, J.; Lu, H. Extension of the Upper Yellow River into the Tibet Plateau: Review and New Data. Quaternary 2021, 4, 14. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/quat4020014

AMA Style

Li Z, Wang X, Vandenberghe J, Lu H. Extension of the Upper Yellow River into the Tibet Plateau: Review and New Data. Quaternary. 2021; 4(2):14. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/quat4020014

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Zhengchen, Xianyan Wang, Jef Vandenberghe, and Huayu Lu. 2021. "Extension of the Upper Yellow River into the Tibet Plateau: Review and New Data" Quaternary 4, no. 2: 14. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/quat4020014

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