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Article

Management of Diabetes Mellitus in Refugee and Migrant Patients in a Primary Healthcare Setting in Greece: A Pilot Intervention

1
Dietetic Department, Polyclinic of Olympic Village, 13672 Αxarnai, Attiki, Greece
2
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology & Medical Statistics, School of Medical, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 11527 Athens, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 November 2020 / Revised: 18 December 2020 / Accepted: 28 December 2020 / Published: 4 January 2021
Over the past years there is a substantial wave of migrants and refugees all over the world. Europe accepts approximately one-third of the international migrant population with Greece, in particular, having received large numbers of refugees and migrants by land and sea since the beginning of the civil war in Syria. Diabetes, a non-communicable disease, is a global health problem, affecting people in developing countries, refugees and migrants, and its basic treatment tool includes self-management and education. In this pilot study, we organized educational, interactive group sessions for diabetic refugees, based on culture, health, and nutritional needs according to a questionnaire developed for the study. The sessions were weekly, for two months, in the context of primary healthcare, organized by a dietitian. Nine individuals completed the sessions, five of nine were diagnosed in Greece and seven of nine needed diabetes education. Their waist circumference was above normal and they were all cooking at home. Their nutritional habits improved by attending the sessions and the interaction helped their social integration. They all found the sessions useful, and felt more self-confident regarding diabetes control and healthier. View Full-Text
Keywords: refugees; diabetes; self-management; group sessions; nutrition; primary healthcare refugees; diabetes; self-management; group sessions; nutrition; primary healthcare
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kolomvotsou, A.I.; Riza, E. Management of Diabetes Mellitus in Refugee and Migrant Patients in a Primary Healthcare Setting in Greece: A Pilot Intervention. Epidemiologia 2021, 2, 14-26. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/epidemiologia2010002

AMA Style

Kolomvotsou AI, Riza E. Management of Diabetes Mellitus in Refugee and Migrant Patients in a Primary Healthcare Setting in Greece: A Pilot Intervention. Epidemiologia. 2021; 2(1):14-26. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/epidemiologia2010002

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kolomvotsou, Anastasia I., and Elena Riza. 2021. "Management of Diabetes Mellitus in Refugee and Migrant Patients in a Primary Healthcare Setting in Greece: A Pilot Intervention" Epidemiologia 2, no. 1: 14-26. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/epidemiologia2010002

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