Special Issue "Pain and Chronic Pain"

A special issue of J (ISSN 2571-8800). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicine & Pharmacology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (27 August 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. James David Adams
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, 1985 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
Interests: chronic pain; severe pain; plant medicines; traditional healing; California Indian healing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pain and chronic pain are major health problems that are usually treated with oral opioids and oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. These drugs are dangerous and kill thousands of people yearly from respiratory depression, seizures, ulcers, heart attacks, and strokes. This issue will discuss mechanisms of induction of pain and chronic pain, especially in the skin. Transient receptor potential cation channels and other skin pain receptors will be of interest. The use of topical medicines in the treatment of pain and chronic pain will be a central theme of the issue. The use of cannabinoids, monoterpenoids, and other plant-derived medicines will be included. 

Prof. Dr. James David Adams
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. J is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pain
  • chronic pain
  • monoterpenoids
  • transient receptor potential cation channels
  • cannabinoids

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Perceptions Regarding Daith Piercing in Migraine, A Survey of Pediatric Patients
J 2020, 3(3), 289-298; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/j3030022 - 31 Aug 2020
Viewed by 2989
Abstract
The treatment of migraine is evolving to include non-traditional approaches, as pharmacologic therapy alone is unsuccessful in many patients. Daith piercing, a cartilaginous ear piercing, has become popular as a potential nonpharmacological treatment option for migraine. However, there are no systematic data on [...] Read more.
The treatment of migraine is evolving to include non-traditional approaches, as pharmacologic therapy alone is unsuccessful in many patients. Daith piercing, a cartilaginous ear piercing, has become popular as a potential nonpharmacological treatment option for migraine. However, there are no systematic data on the utilization and efficacy of these piercings. Therefore, we investigated the perceptions of pediatric patients regarding Daith piercing and gathered initial retrospective data for patients who had already received it. Patients presenting to a pediatric neurology clinic were invited to complete a questionnaire to assess knowledge about and attitudes towards Daith piercing and their willingness to undergo such a treatment. For those with a Daith piercing, the effects on headaches, function, and mood were evaluated. Of the 171 respondents, 61% had prior knowledge of Daith piercings, 27% knew someone with a Daith piercing, and 60% of patients presenting with headache were willing to undergo piercing. Of the eight patients (5% of respondents) who had already undergone piercing, six (75%) reported improvement in headaches, five (62%) had missed fewer days of school or work, and seven (87%) reported mood improvement. The high proportion of pediatric patients willing to undergo this form of treatment speaks to the desire for and acceptance of nonpharmacologic treatments. Although based on a small sample, the data from children who have already undergone Daith piercing is promising and supports a need for further systematic investigation into this treatment approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pain and Chronic Pain)
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Review

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Review
Monoterpenoids: The Next Frontier in the Treatment of Chronic Pain?
J 2020, 3(2), 195-214; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/j3020016 - 28 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1259
Abstract
Ointments and lotions from natural extracts have a long tradition of being used in folk medicines against pain conditions. Monoterpenoids are among the major constituents of several natural topical remedies. The field of chronic pain is one of the most investigated for new [...] Read more.
Ointments and lotions from natural extracts have a long tradition of being used in folk medicines against pain conditions. Monoterpenoids are among the major constituents of several natural topical remedies. The field of chronic pain is one of the most investigated for new active molecular entities. This review will discuss several molecular mechanisms against which monoterpenoids have been proven to be good candidates for the topical treatment of chronic pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pain and Chronic Pain)
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