Special Issue "Agricultural Food Security and Economic Analysis"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Economics, Policies and Rural Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Wojciech J. Florkowski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223-1797, USA
Interests: food insecurity of rural and urban households; food loss prevention and reduction through storage; effects of climate change and weather events on food security; seed and other inputs in relation to productivity; dietary preferences and safety; preservation of food quality; protection of family farm; sustainable farming practices and food security; advisory service role in food security enhancement; food distribution system and food security; policies hampering and enhancing food security

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food security is a multifaceted issue that continues to receive much attention from researchers across the world. Food security affects rural and urban households, whether engaged in raising food or not. Among those affected are family farmers whose efforts are challenged by issues such as weather events, climate change, poor storage, input markets, lack of accurate price signals, and sales contract enforcement failure, to name a few. Furthermore, among farming households facing food insecurity are not only the ultra-poor subsistence farmers but those who participate in market exchanges, at least seasonally. Education, experience, access to extension services and current knowledge, and division of responsibilities within a family farm household also may influence household food security. The recent global COVID-19 pandemic has become a potential source of food insecurity to farm households that did not experience food shortage in the past. Those and related topics are of interest to this issue of Agriculture.

This Special Issue invites submissions addressing these and other issues shaping food security across the world’s farms and farming communities. Food security includes food loss and food waste interpreted as unintended outcomes (FAO, 2019). The ability to raise food but a failure to protect it may be exacerbated by poor storage that has been understudied in the context of food security and transportation, causing quality changes leading to loss and food insecurity. The choice of crops, farming technique, and household labor resources are increasingly important because of unpredictable weather patterns from one growing season to another. The persistence of shifting weather patterns over time requires an ability to adapt, including raising new crops and acceptance of their use in farm household members’ diet. Empirical studies applying rigorous methods to examine such circumstances are encouraged, focusing on economic aspects and farmer decision-making using micro-level data.

Prof. Dr. Wojciech J. Florkowski
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food insecurity
  • Food loss
  • Climate change
  • Family farm
  • Sustainability
  • Diet quality
  • Agricultural productivity
  • Safety
  • Policy
  • Distribution

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Assessing Food Insecurity and Its Drivers among Smallholder Farming Households in Rural Oyo State, Nigeria: The HFIAS Approach
Agriculture 2021, 11(12), 1189; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11121189 - 25 Nov 2021
Viewed by 358
Abstract
Hunger and food insecurity take center stage in most debates in Africa, and in recent times with serious concerns about Nigeria. This study assessed food insecurity among farming households in rural Oyo State, Nigeria, using cross-sectional datasets from 211 farming households through a [...] Read more.
Hunger and food insecurity take center stage in most debates in Africa, and in recent times with serious concerns about Nigeria. This study assessed food insecurity among farming households in rural Oyo State, Nigeria, using cross-sectional datasets from 211 farming households through a multi-stage sampling procedure. The Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) module was employed in assessing food insecurity status of farming households, and the ordered logit model (OLM) was used to analyze factors influencing food insecurity among farming households. The results revealed that 12.8% of the farming households were food secure while 87.2% had varying levels of food insecurity. The OLM results indicated that age, household head’s years of schooling, gender, farm size, farm experience, non-farm income, food expenditure, and access to extension service significantly influenced food insecurity among farming households. Based on the findings, efforts should be geared towards promoting households’ education-related intervention programs in order to improve their nutrition-related knowledge that can enhance their food security status. Additionally, there should be provision of rural infrastructural facilities such as piped water, rural electrification, and healthcare service that promote healthy living and enhance households’ agricultural productivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Security and Economic Analysis)
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Article
Underutilised Indigenous Vegetables for Household Dietary Diversity in Southwest Nigeria
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1064; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111064 - 28 Oct 2021
Viewed by 340
Abstract
The diets of many households in developing countries are monotonous and starch-based. Integrating underutilised indigenous vegetables (UIVs) to cropping systems can contribute to both crop and dietary diversities, thereby improving rural households’ nutrition and boosting food security. Therefore, this study established a link [...] Read more.
The diets of many households in developing countries are monotonous and starch-based. Integrating underutilised indigenous vegetables (UIVs) to cropping systems can contribute to both crop and dietary diversities, thereby improving rural households’ nutrition and boosting food security. Therefore, this study established a link between the UIVs’ diversity and the household dietary diversity (HDD) of the UIVs producers in the rural area of Southwest Nigeria. A multistage sampling technique was used to select 191 UIV-producing households in the region. Their HDD was measured based on the 12 unique food groups consumed by households over a 7-day reference period preceding the survey, and negative binomial Poisson regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between UIV diversities, other sociodemographic characteristics, and the HDD score of the UIV-producing households in the area. The results showed that only about four groups of food contributed greatly to the HDD score. The result of the negative binomial Poisson regression analysis showed UIVs diversity as a significant variable that increased the HDD score in the study area. Other factors that determined the HDD score of UIV-producing households were the marital status of the household head, farm distance from the home, UIVs land area, off-farm income, UIVs gross margin, per capita food expenditure, and Oyo location. The study concluded that the inclusion of diverse underutilised indigenous vegetables into cropping systems in rural areas and vegetable home gardening practices in the rural and urban areas of developing countries could alleviate the challenge of nutrition insecurity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Security and Economic Analysis)
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Article
Recent Patterns of Exposure, Sensitivity, and Adaptive Capacity of Selected Crops in Cameroon
Agriculture 2021, 11(6), 550; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11060550 - 16 Jun 2021
Viewed by 546
Abstract
In most parts of sub-Saharan Africa, precipitation is impacted by climate change. In some countries like Cameroon, it is still not clear how maize, millet and rice will respond to changes in growing season precipitation. This work examines the exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive [...] Read more.
In most parts of sub-Saharan Africa, precipitation is impacted by climate change. In some countries like Cameroon, it is still not clear how maize, millet and rice will respond to changes in growing season precipitation. This work examines the exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity of the above crops to droughts at both the national and sub-national scale. Crop yield data were culled from FAOSTAT while growing season precipitation data were culled from the database of UNDP/Oxford University and the climate portal of the World Bank. Adaptive capacity proxies (literacy, and poverty rate) were collected from KNOEMA and the African Development Bank. The analysis was performed using the vulnerability index equation. Nationally, millet has the lowest vulnerability and rice has the highest. At the sub-national scale, northern maize has the highest vulnerability followed by western highland rice. It is observed that when scales change, the crops that are vulnerable also change. However, at both levels vulnerability has an inverse relationship with adaptive capacity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Security and Economic Analysis)
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Review

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Review
Hazard Analysis of Traditional Post-Harvest Operation Methods and the Loss Reduction Effect Based on Five Time (5T) Management: The Case of Rice in Jilin Province, China
Agriculture 2021, 11(9), 877; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11090877 - 13 Sep 2021
Viewed by 429
Abstract
Traditional post-harvest operation methods applied in rice fields lack advanced management knowledge and technology, which has led to post-harvest losses. We proposed the concept of Five Time (5T) management for the first time. 5T management divides the whole life cycle of rice into [...] Read more.
Traditional post-harvest operation methods applied in rice fields lack advanced management knowledge and technology, which has led to post-harvest losses. We proposed the concept of Five Time (5T) management for the first time. 5T management divides the whole life cycle of rice into different growth time interval to complete process management. This paper mainly introduces the management of rice grain period, that is, the post-harvest management period, including the operation process management of harvesting, field stacking, drying, warehousing, and storing. In 2019, our research team formulated the 5T management method, which considers the entire post-harvest process, and carried out a pilot application of this method at the Jilin Rice Industry Alliance of Jilin Province. Moreover, to promote the 5T management method, our research team carried out follow-up experiments in rice production enterprises and found severe post-harvest rice losses. This paper combined a large number of literature and the basic theory research of rice post-harvest to analyze the traditional methods for post-harvest processing and the associated rice losses. By implementing the 5T management method, 4.33% of losses incurred during the T1 harvesting period could be recovered. In the T2 field period, drying rice within 48 h after harvesting could reduce losses by 2.5%. In the T3 drying period, the loss rate could be reduced by 1.6% if traditional drying methods were replaced by mechanical drying and by 0.6% if cyclic drying was implemented to prevent over-drying. In the T5 storage period, the loss rate of 7% could be reduced by adopting advanced grain storage technologies such as low-temperature storage. Overall, the rice loss rate could be reduced by 15.43%, which is equivalent to a yield of 32.68 million tonnes of rice. The important factors in each period are strictly controlled in the 5T management method to prevent the post-harvest losses caused by flawed concepts and improper management and to increase the amount of usable fertile land. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Security and Economic Analysis)
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