Special Issue "Management and Strategies for Improving the Use of Saline Water in Agriculture"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Peiling Yang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Water Resources and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: irrigation; water-saving technologies; ecological irrigation district; soil quality improvement; simulation of water movement; crop nutrition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Renkuan Liao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Irrigation and Drainage, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, Beijing 100048, China
Interests: agricultural water management; soil and water environment restoration; environmental tracer technology; root water uptake model; water transport model
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Yunkai Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Water Resources and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: drip irrigation; water quality; fertigation; irrigation engineering; microirrigation; saline water

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Global water shortage has caused great challenges to the sustainable development of agriculture. Saline water has been regarded as an alternative to agricultural irrigation, which plays an increasingly important role in agricultural irrigation in water shortage areas. However, long-term saline irrigation or unreasonable irrigation patterns can lead to adverse environmental problems, such as soil salinization or crop loss. Therefore, it’s necessary to study management and strategies for improving the use of saline water in agriculture.

This special issue aims to publish original research or review articles on the use of saline water for irrigation. These articles will cover a broad range from technology research to policy suggestion, including the simulation of water and salt transport, the optimal mode of saline irrigation, the effects of saline irrigation on crop growth, the environmental impact assessment of saline irrigation, and the policy of saline irrigation development.

Prof. Dr. Peiling Yang
Dr. Renkuan Liao
Prof. Dr. Yunkai Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • saline water
  • sustainable agriculture
  • water and salt transport
  • environmental impact assessment
  • irrigation technique
  • irrigation strategy
  • soil salinization
  • water use efficiency

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Adapting Root Distribution and Improving Water Use Efficiency via Drip Irrigation in a Jujube (Zizyphus jujube Mill.) Orchard after Long-Term Flood Irrigation
Agriculture 2021, 11(12), 1184; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11121184 - 24 Nov 2021
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Abstract
Jujube tree yields in dryland saline soils are restricted by water shortages and soil salinity. Converting traditional flood irrigation to drip irrigation would solve water deficit and salt stress. The root distribution reacts primarily to the availability of water and nutrients. However, there [...] Read more.
Jujube tree yields in dryland saline soils are restricted by water shortages and soil salinity. Converting traditional flood irrigation to drip irrigation would solve water deficit and salt stress. The root distribution reacts primarily to the availability of water and nutrients. However, there is little information about the response of jujube roots to the change from flood irrigation to drip irrigation. In this context, a two–year experiment was carried out to reveal the effects of the change from long–term flood irrigation to drip irrigation on soil water, root distribution, fruit yield, and water use efficiency (WUE) of jujube trees. In this study, drip irrigation amounts were designed with three levels, i.e., 880 mm (W1), 660 mm (W2), 440 mm (W3), and the flood irrigation of 1100 mm was designed as the control (CK). The results showed that replacing flood irrigation with drip irrigation significantly altered soil water distribution and increased soil moisture in the topsoil (0–40 cm). In the drip irrigation treatments with high levels, soil water storage in the 0–60 cm soil layer at the flowering and fruit setting, and fruit swelling stages of jujube trees increased significantly compared with the flood irrigation. After two consecutive years of drip irrigation, the treatments with higher irrigation levels increased root length density (RLD) in 0–60 cm soil depth but decreased that in the 60–100 cm depth. In the horizontal direction, higher irrigation levels increased RLD in the distance of 0–50 cm, while reducing RLD in the distance of 50–100 cm. However, the opposite conclusion was obtained in W3 treatment. Additionally, in the second year of drip irrigation, W2 treatment (660 mm) significantly improved yield and WUE, with an increasing of 7.6% for yield and 60.3% for WUE compared to the flood irrigation. In summary, converting flood irrigation to drip irrigation is useful in regulating root distribution and improving WUE, which would be a promising method in jujube cultivation in arid regions. Full article
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Article
Simulation of Soil Water and Heat Flow under Plastic Mulching and Different Ridge Patterns
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1099; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111099 - 04 Nov 2021
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Abstract
The ridge–furrow mulching system with plastic film (RFMS) has been widely used in semi-arid areas in order to improve soil water and heat conditions, crop yields and water use efficiency. It is of practical significance to study the effect of mulching and ridge [...] Read more.
The ridge–furrow mulching system with plastic film (RFMS) has been widely used in semi-arid areas in order to improve soil water and heat conditions, crop yields and water use efficiency. It is of practical significance to study the effect of mulching and ridge types on soil water and heat in order to optimize mulching measures and improve the effectiveness of the ridge and furrow system. To clarify the combined effect of soil water and heat beneath the system and the influence of ridge morphology on it, field experiments were conducted with three treatments, including conventional planting in bare land (CK), a ridge–furrow (wide ridge with 70 cm width and 10 cm height, narrow ridge with 40 cm width and 15 cm height) mulching system with complete plastic film (RFWN) and a ridge–furrow (equal ridge with 55 cm width and 15 cm height) mulching system with complete plastic film (RFE). An insufficient irrigation system was adopted and the two-dimensional numerical software HYDRUS-2D was used to simulate the soil water and heat flow under the experimental conditions. The model was calibrated and verified according to test data for the period of 2018 to 2019, which showed good agreement between the simulated and measured values. The simulation results revealed that the ground temperatures of RFWN and RFE were much higher than that of CK, and the average value of 0–25 cm during the growth period could increase by 2.29–4.61%. Compared with CK, RFWN and RFE reduced soil evaporation (84.71–93.73%) and field evapotranspiration (12.02–21.75%), while they increased root water uptake (25.87–40.98%) and T/ET (48.85–80.15%). Plastic film mulching and ridge morphologies affected the infiltration range and the direction of soil water movement, increased soil moisture when there was no rainfall or irrigation and reduced soil water and heat fluctuations, which was more conducive to crop growth, especially under the RFWN system. The simulation method proposed in this paper is an effective technique for calculating the soil water and heat dynamics under different ridge and furrow sections under the condition of film mulching, and it can be used for the optimal management of soil water and heat in this area. Full article
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Article
A Separation and Desalination Process for Farmland Saline-Alkaline Water
Agriculture 2021, 11(10), 1001; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11101001 - 13 Oct 2021
Viewed by 337
Abstract
Salination poses serious hazards to farmland soil. For the purpose of solving soil salination, desalination of water sources, and other problems faced by arid areas, a separation and desalination process for farmland saline-alkaline water is proposed; a separation and desalination device based on [...] Read more.
Salination poses serious hazards to farmland soil. For the purpose of solving soil salination, desalination of water sources, and other problems faced by arid areas, a separation and desalination process for farmland saline-alkaline water is proposed; a separation and desalination device based on this process is also presented and tested. Results indicate that water associated with the pretreatment device satisfied the working conditions of the composite nanofiltration (NF)-reverse osmosis (RO) membrane system. The composite NF-RO membrane system produced a better filtering effect than either the NF membrane or the RO membrane. When used for filtering saline-alkaline water, the composite NF-RO membrane system achieved a desalination rate of 96.06%, a total hardness removal rate of 98.93%, and a Cl- removal rate of 99.32%, adhering to the standard for irrigation water quality. The flashing-condensation process realized a fresh water recovery rate greater than 70%. During brine evaporation using solar salt making processes, the primary compound of crystals precipitated was NaCl (with a relative content of 93%), suggesting that the precipitates have the potential values of industrial salts. These findings offer new technical references for solving the problem of farmland irrigation water faced by saline-alkaline areas worldwide. Full article
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