Special Issue "Culturally Responsive Trauma-Informed Care"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Social Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Hyojin Im
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Work, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
Interests: Refugee Trauma; Mental Health & Psychosocial Support; Refugee Resettlement; Social Capital; Community-Based Participatory Research; Community Capacity Building for Trauma-Informed Care; Cultural Concept of Distress; Cultural Psychology
Dr. Linda L. Semu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
McDaniel College, 2 College Hill, 228 Lewis Recitation Hall, Westminster, MD 21157, USA
Interests: Comparative international sociology focusing on the intersection of gender: i. Globalization, migration, race, and identity; ii. Health, HIV/AIDS, and well-being; iii. Land, food security, social policy, and social movements; iv.Gender, social change, urbanization, and family; v. Social demography and research methods
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is widely accepted as a standard for assessment and intervention that not only acknowledges but also respects and integrates the cultural values, beliefs, and practices of patients and families. However, relatively little has been discussed as to how different cultural dimensions may or should be considered in TIC and how the intersection between trauma and culture can inform service access and delivery, staff competency, organizational policy, as well as service outcomes. Given that certain cultural dimensions (e.g., racial, gender, and social identities) tend to account for significant disparities in service access and needed support, special attention and caution will be requested in TIC for the populations who are culturally underrepresented or marginalized. This Special Issue is interested in how cultural humility and sensitivity can be incorporated into elements and principles of TIC and what lessons we have learned to create culturally responsive trauma-informed practice and policy in the current care systems.

Prof. Dr. Hyojin Im
Dr. Linda L. Semu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • trauma-informed care
  • culture-informed care
  • cultural competency, cultural humility, cultural safety
  • cultural minorities (immigrants, refugees, LGBTQIA, racial/ethnic minorities, etc.)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Working towards Culturally Responsive Trauma-Informed Care in the Refugee Resettlement Process: Qualitative Inquiry with Refugee-Serving Professionals in the United States
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 155; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bs11110155 - 07 Nov 2021
Viewed by 830
Abstract
Trauma-informed care (TIC) approaches have gained popularity in various contexts of human services over the past decades. However, relatively little has been explored about how it is applicable and built into services for refugee populations in resettlement programs. This study explores the current [...] Read more.
Trauma-informed care (TIC) approaches have gained popularity in various contexts of human services over the past decades. However, relatively little has been explored about how it is applicable and built into services for refugee populations in resettlement programs. This study explores the current status of the application of TIC in refugee-serving agencies and identifies perceived and experienced challenges and opportunities for culturally responsive TIC in the United States. As designed as part of the evaluation of state-wide refugee health promotion programs, this study conducted individual interviews with 78 refugee service providers from five resettlement sites. Despite the burgeoning interest and attempt to embrace TIC, our findings show that there is clear inconsistency and inexperience in TIC adaptation in resettlement programs. This study highlights that TIC that is culturally responsive and relevant to refugee trauma and acculturation experiences is a vital way to address the chasms between refugee-specific programs and mainstream services including mental health care systems. This study also discusses community resources and opportunities to bridge the deep divide and substantial gaps between mental health services and refugee resettlement services and to address comprehensive needs around mental health and wellness in the refugee community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Culturally Responsive Trauma-Informed Care)

Review

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Review
Ketamine-Assisted and Culturally Attuned Trauma Informed Psychotherapy as Adjunct to Traditional Indigenous Healing: Effecting Cultural Collaboration in Canadian Mental Health Care
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(9), 118; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/bs11090118 - 31 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1323
Abstract
Ketamine therapy with culturally attuned trauma-informed psychotherapy in a collaborative cross-cultural partnership may provide a critical step in the operationalization and optimization of treatment effectiveness in diverse populations and may provide a foundation for an improved quality of life for Indigenous people. Decolonizing [...] Read more.
Ketamine therapy with culturally attuned trauma-informed psychotherapy in a collaborative cross-cultural partnership may provide a critical step in the operationalization and optimization of treatment effectiveness in diverse populations and may provide a foundation for an improved quality of life for Indigenous people. Decolonizing Indigenous health and wellbeing is long overdue, requiring an equal partnership between government and Indigenous communities, built upon an aboriginal culture holistic foundation of balance of mind, body, social and spiritual realms, and within the context of historical and lived experiences of colonialism. Culturally attuned trauma-informed psychotherapy paired with ketamine—a fast-acting antidepressant that typically takes effect within 4 hours, even in cases of acute suicidality—may be uniquely qualified to integrate into an Indigenous based health system, since ketamine’s therapeutic effects engage multiple neuropsychological, physiological, biological, and behavioral systems damaged by intergenerational complex developmental trauma. Ketamine holds the potential to serve as a core treatment modality around which culturally engaged treatment approaches might be organized since its brief alteration of normal waking consciousness is already a familiar and intrinsic element of healing culture in many Indigenous societies. There is great need and desire in Indigenous communities for respectful and sacred partnership in fostering more effective mental health outcomes and improved quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Culturally Responsive Trauma-Informed Care)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Cultural Sensitivity in trauma informed care for South Asian clients
Authors: Shreya Bhandari
Affiliation: Professor of Social Work at Wright State University
Abstract: Trauma-informed approach takes into consideration a person's awareness of the impact and consequences of trauma exposure. It emphasizes, "physical, psychological, and emotional safety of providers and survivors and creates opportunities to rebuild a sense of control and empowerment" (Hooper, Basuk, & Oliver, 2010, P.82). In my work as a researcher doing domestic violence work and as a therapist offering mental health therapy, here are a few recommendations to provide cultural sensitive trauma informed care. (1) South Asians belong to a collectivist culture and hence family plays a larger role in important decisions of their lives, (2) Setting boundaries with toxic family members may be an alien concept and will take time, (3) Probing about different messaging around roles of girls and boys and later men and women and how they feel about it is important as son preference is subtle but omnipresent (4) "Log kya kahenge" (what will people( community) say?) is a real fear and hence validating it and then challenging it is a key.

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