Special Issue "Considerations in Pediatric Emergency Medicine"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Integrative Pediatrics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Richard Lichenstein
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
Interests: pediatric emergency medicine; injury prevention; disaster preparedness
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Jennifer F. Anders
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
Interests: pediatric emergency research; fellowship training
Dr. Getachew Teshome
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
Interests: pediatric emergency medicine; quality improvement; acute bronchiolitis; procedural sedation; telemedicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although the care of children in emergency situations has always been acknowledged, the development of pediatric emergency medicine into a more clearly described area of a pediatric subspecialty has only been seen over the last 40 years. Pediatric emergency medicine now encompasses not only direct care in the emergency department but also prehospital care, innovations in diagnostic testing, and radiology advances, as well as advancements in medical and trauma care. In addition, pediatric emergency medicine also incorporates quality improvement initiatives to improve the safety and quality of emergency care in all settings, including community emergency departments, academic medical centers, and children’s hospitals and urgent care facilities. This Special Issue addresses a wide variety of topics that surround pediatric emergency medicine that have previously been rarely considered or have developed with new innovations or scientific advances. We recognize the tremendous growth and scope of pediatric emergency medicine which continuously encourages us to assess all evidence and experience so that we can continue to strive to provide the best care possible for the populations we treat.

Prof. Richard Lichenstein
Dr. Jennifer F. Anders
Dr. Getachew Teshome
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pediatric prehospital care
  • Pediatric emergency radiology
  • Pediatric trauma
  • Pediatric interfacility transfer
  • Appendicitis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Creating a Pediatric Prehospital Destination Decision Tool Using a Modified Delphi Method
Children 2021, 8(8), 658; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8080658 - 29 Jul 2021
Viewed by 309
Abstract
Decisions for patient transport by emergency medical services (EMS) are individualized; while established guidelines help direct adult patients to specialty hospitals, no such pediatric equivalents are in wide use. When children are transported to a hospital that cannot provide definitive care, care is [...] Read more.
Decisions for patient transport by emergency medical services (EMS) are individualized; while established guidelines help direct adult patients to specialty hospitals, no such pediatric equivalents are in wide use. When children are transported to a hospital that cannot provide definitive care, care is delayed and may cause adverse events. Therefore, we created a novel evidence-based decision tool to support EMS destination choice. A multidisciplinary expert panel (EP) of stakeholders reviewed published literature. Four facility capability levels for pediatric care were defined. Using a modified Delphi method, the EP matched specific conditions to a facility pediatric-capability level in a draft tool. The literature review and EP recommendations identified seventeen pediatric medical conditions at risk for secondary transport. In the first voting round, two were rejected, nine met consensus for a specific facility capability level, and six did not reach consensus on the destination facility level. A second round reached consensus on a facility level for the six conditions as well as revision of one previously rejected condition. In the third round, the panel selected a visual display format. Finally, the panel unanimously approved the PDTree. Using a modified Delphi technique, we developed the PDTree EMS destination decision tool by incorporating existing evidence and the expertise of a multidisciplinary panel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Considerations in Pediatric Emergency Medicine)
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Article
Polish Medical Air Rescue Crew Interventions Concerning Neonatal Patients
Children 2021, 8(7), 557; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8070557 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 438
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to present the characteristics of Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) and Emergency Medical Service (EMS) interventions concerning newborns in Poland. The study involved a retrospective analysis of missions by Polish Medical Air Rescue crews concerning newborns, carried [...] Read more.
The purpose of the study was to present the characteristics of Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) and Emergency Medical Service (EMS) interventions concerning newborns in Poland. The study involved a retrospective analysis of missions by Polish Medical Air Rescue crews concerning newborns, carried out in Poland between January 2011 and December 2020. Polish Medical Air Rescue crews were most commonly dispatched to urban areas (86.83%), for patient transfer (59.67%), using an airplane (65.43%), between 7 AM and 6:59 PM (93.14%), and in the summer (28.67%). Further management involved handing over the neonatal patient to a ground neonatal ambulance team. Most of the patients studied were male (58.02%), and the most common diagnosis requiring the HEMS or EMS intervention was a congenital heart defect (31.41%). The most common medical emergency procedure performed by Polish Medical Air Rescue crew members for the neonatal patients was intravenous cannulation (43.07%). The odds ratio for congenital malformations was higher in male newborns. The type of Polish Medical Air Rescue mission was associated with the location of the call, time of the call, ICD-10 diagnosis associated with the dispatch, selected clinical findings, most commonly performed medical emergency procedures, and mission duration and distance covered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Considerations in Pediatric Emergency Medicine)

Review

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Review
Magnetic Resonance Imaging as the Primary Imaging Modality in Children Presenting with Inflammatory Nontraumatic Atlantoaxial Rotatory Subluxation
Children 2021, 8(5), 329; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8050329 - 23 Apr 2021
Viewed by 416
Abstract
Inflammatory nontraumatic atlantoaxial rotatory subluxation (AAS) in children is an often-missed diagnosis, especially in the early stages of disease. Abscess formation and spinal cord compression are serious risks that call for immediate surgical attention. Neither radiographs nor non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images sufficiently [...] Read more.
Inflammatory nontraumatic atlantoaxial rotatory subluxation (AAS) in children is an often-missed diagnosis, especially in the early stages of disease. Abscess formation and spinal cord compression are serious risks that call for immediate surgical attention. Neither radiographs nor non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images sufficiently indicate inflammatory processes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a thorough evaluation of paraspinal soft tissues, joints, and ligaments. In addition, it can show evidence of vertebral distraction and spinal cord compression. After conducting a scoping review of the literature, along with scientific and practical considerations, we outlined a standardized pediatric MRI protocol for suspected inflammatory nontraumatic AAS. We recommend contrast-enhanced MRI as the primary diagnostic imaging modality in children with signs of torticollis in combination with nasopharyngeal inflammatory or ear nose and throat (ENT) surgical history. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Considerations in Pediatric Emergency Medicine)
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