Special Issue "Innovations in Ecological Public Health and Health Education"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Medics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 May 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maya K. Gislason
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada
Interests: social inequities in health; ecosystem approaches to health; nature-health; intergenerational climate equity; womens and childrens health
Prof. Dr. José Carmelo Adsuar Sala
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Sport Science, University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: sport tourism; chronic pain; health-related quality of life; health education; education and innovation; global health; physical and sports activities as a strategy to promote a healthy society; physical activity interventions; exercise training physical exercise; diabetes mellitus
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this special issue we invite a range of perspectives on using asset- and strengths-based, decolonizing, anti-racist, and equity informed approaches to teaching and learning around the interconnection between human, animal and ecosystem health.

Ecological public health is an arena of scholarship and practice focused on the interrelationships between the health of humans, animals and ecosystems. Whether in public health, medicine or medical specialisms such as paediatrics, and across scales from rural through to global health, there is a growing call from students to learn more about human health in the context of the living world. Pandemics, not only COVID-19 but also Syndemics, illuminate the complex interplay between structural inequities and the disproportionate effects of ecological events on a range of equity deserving populations.  

This special issue is intended to foreground and celebrate work that is advancing equity and diversity informed approaches to understanding the interplay between a range of determinants of health (social, environmental, ecological, planetary, Indigenous). Does your teaching help students process the enormity of the intergenerational climate justice issues they face? Has your curriculum brought Indigenous knowledge, knowledge holders and decolonizing approaches to teach about the interconnection between humans, animals and the earth? Have you developed educational frameworks or core competencies to guide a new generation of ecological public health work? What innovations in experiential education, and novel approaches to course delivery have you championed? How are you co-creating knowledge with students and colleagues? How are you evaluating the efficacy and learning outcomes of this innovative teaching and learning? How does our education help students understand and work with people in the context of their living realities? Are you working in the context of an education unit that does not embrace this work, what are your strategies for moving ahead in this innovative space?

Dr. Maya K. Gislason
Prof. Dr. José Carmelo Adsuar Sala
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • experiential education, eco-social health
  • health equity
  • social determinants of health
  • environmental determinants of health
  • ecological determinants of health
  • one Health
  • planetary Health
  • ecosystem Approaches to Health
  • ecohealth
  • teaching and learning
  • fieldschools
  • innovation
  • scholarship of teaching and learning
  • climate change
  • community engagement
  • participatory action research
  • pedagogy
  • curriculum
  • arts based methods
  • outdoor education
  • social justice
  • decolonizing practices
  • asset based
  • strengths based
  • public health
  • indigenous
  • indigenizing
  • epistemology
  • critical theory
  • intersectionality
  • interdisciplinarity
  • transdisciplinarity
  • two-eyed seeing

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Engagement of Nepalese High-School Students in Cancer Awareness Using a Photovoice Based on the Health Belief Model
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1283; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/healthcare9101283 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 354
Abstract
Delivering cancer education is one of the strategies for implementing health promotion and disease prevention programs. Moreover, cancer education can help people understand the risks related to specific behaviors that can trigger cancer during later life stages. This study examines the cancer perception [...] Read more.
Delivering cancer education is one of the strategies for implementing health promotion and disease prevention programs. Moreover, cancer education can help people understand the risks related to specific behaviors that can trigger cancer during later life stages. This study examines the cancer perception of high school students (median age: 14 years) using a photovoice based on the health belief model. Students were requested to take photographs to answer the framework question: “How is cancer present in your surrounding?” A theoretical thematic analysis was conducted to develop codes, and the narratives completed by the participants on the SHOWED checklist were used to create contextualization. With the use of the health belief model, the following factors were determined: risk factors and environmental pollution (perceived susceptibility), symptoms (perceived severity), prevention and screening (benefits), ignorance and poverty, and ineffective laws and regulations (perceived barriers). Linked to these themes, students’ narration demonstrated the risk of developing cancer if the same environment and inadequate regulations persisted. This study highlights the need to incorporate the participation of adolescents in the design, implementation, and monitoring of several community issues to help address several unanswered questions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Ecological Public Health and Health Education)
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Article
The Perception of Rural Medical Students Regarding the Future of General Medicine: A Thematic Analysis
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1256; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/healthcare9101256 - 24 Sep 2021
Viewed by 557
Abstract
Although the demand for general physicians has increased in Japan because of its aging population, medical universities primarily provide organ-based education; thus, medical students do not receive sufficient general medical education. The number of residents focusing on general medicine remains low; therefore, to [...] Read more.
Although the demand for general physicians has increased in Japan because of its aging population, medical universities primarily provide organ-based education; thus, medical students do not receive sufficient general medical education. The number of residents focusing on general medicine remains low; therefore, to understand the present situation regarding general medicine education, we attempted to clarify the views of medical students and the factors influencing them. In this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were conducted in 12 medical students at Shimane University, and the results were analyzed through thematic analysis. The results indicated the emergence of three themes and 14 concepts. The three overarching themes were as follows: hopes for the field of general medicine, gaps between ideal and reality of general medicine, and factors affecting students’ motivation for specialization in general medicine. Medical students had a positive impression of general medicine and believed that it has potential for further development; however, they felt a gap between their ideals and reality (i.e., unclear expertise). Factors creating this gap included poorly developed education and medical policies. We need to restructure general medicine education based on the participants’ perceptions by establishing collaborative curricula between universities and community hospitals and by increasing students’ exposure to general medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Ecological Public Health and Health Education)
Article
Actual and Perceived Level of Scientific English across Italian Physiotherapy Courses: A Cross-Sectional Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(9), 1135; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/healthcare9091135 - 31 Aug 2021
Viewed by 302
Abstract
The knowledge of the English language is fundamental for the application of evidence-based practice. Hence, this study explores, through an online survey, the (1) perceived and (2) actual level of Scientific English among Italian undergraduate (UGs) and postgraduate (PGs) physiotherapists. As for (1), [...] Read more.
The knowledge of the English language is fundamental for the application of evidence-based practice. Hence, this study explores, through an online survey, the (1) perceived and (2) actual level of Scientific English among Italian undergraduate (UGs) and postgraduate (PGs) physiotherapists. As for (1), the participants expressed their agreement with 10 statements regarding the attitude towards Scientific English through a 1–4 Likert-type scale, with consensus set at ≥70%. As for (2), an ad-hoc 10-point questionnaire was developed through a Delphi procedure, with a pass score set at ≥60%. The survey was completed by 421 participants (UG: 47%; PG: 53%). As for (1), consensus was achieved in both groups in 4 out of 10 statements, specifically the ones addressing the capability to fully understand a scientific paper and physiotherapy-specific language in English. As for (2), the mean score reached by both groups was below 60%. The participants who had studied or were studying at a university in southern Italy presented 2.56 [1.54; 4.24] times higher odds to fail the test. New strategies to bridge the gap in the knowledge of Scientific English in Italy should be developed, through the creation of a unique syllabus tailored to the needs of future physiotherapists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Ecological Public Health and Health Education)
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Article
Knowledge, Perception, and Performance of Hand Hygiene and Their Correlation among Nursing Students in Republic of Korea
Healthcare 2021, 9(7), 913; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/healthcare9070913 - 19 Jul 2021
Viewed by 445
Abstract
Recently, various outbreaks of newly emerging or reemerging diseases are expected more frequently and regularly. The importance of hand hygiene (HH) competency of nursing students (NS) is further required as a crucial learning objective of nursing education in universities. Purpose: This study aimed [...] Read more.
Recently, various outbreaks of newly emerging or reemerging diseases are expected more frequently and regularly. The importance of hand hygiene (HH) competency of nursing students (NS) is further required as a crucial learning objective of nursing education in universities. Purpose: This study aimed to investigate knowledge, perception, and performance of HH among NS and analyze their correlation. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire (modified from a World Health Organization questionnaire) was conducted from 23 November to 22 December 2019; 233 responses were used for the final analysis. Results: The average scores (mean ± standard deviation (range)) for knowledge, perception, and performance of HH were 17.82 ± 2.15 (0–25), 77.24 ± 10.78 (15–96), and 67.42 ± 23.10 (0–100), respectively. No significant variables were discovered to the knowledge of HH. Grade, university-affiliated hospitals, and the most recent healthcare institute of clinical practice nursing course significantly affected perceptions of HH (p < 0.039, p = 044, p < 0.001). Knowledge of HH was positively correlated with performance of HH (p = 0.002). The perception and the performance of HH of NS were positively correlated with HH performance of healthcare workers (HCWs); p < 0.001, p = 0.002. Conclusion: HH education for NS is crucial for improving the performance and the knowledge of HH. Good HH performance of healthcare workers (HCWs) can contribute to increased perception and performance of HH among NS. The cooperation of nursing education in a university and clinical practice with competent HCWs in healthcare institutions may create an effective education program for good HH performance of NS, who will be nurses during unpredictable pandemics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Ecological Public Health and Health Education)
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