Special Issue "Molecular Determinants of Cardiac Arrhythmias"

A special issue of Hearts (ISSN 2673-3846).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Diego Franco Jaime
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Biología Experimental, Universidad de Jaen, 23071 Jaen, Spain
Interests: cardiovascular development; transcriptional regulation; noncoding RNAs; atrial fibrillation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cardiac arrhythmias constitute one of the major burdens in medical practice. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia, with an estimated prevalance of 2–4% in the general population increasing to >10% in the elderly. Sudden cardiac death (SCD), mostly due to ventricular fibrillation, represents a major worldwide public health problem, accounting for 15–20 % of all deaths. Other arrhythmias such as Brugada, long-QT, and short-QT, although having a lower prevalence, similarly provide enormous concerns in terms of societal distress, public health, and medical treatment. Over the last decades, our understanding of the cellular, molecular, and genetics bases of arrhythmogenesis has exponentially increased, including the identification of genetic hallmarks and the identification of electrophysiological and electromechanical bases. Recently, novel insights have been gained via the identification of novel regulatory mechanisms contributing to the onset and course of cardiac arrhythmias, including diverse epigenetic mechanisms. In this Special Issue, we aim to gather state-of-the-art insights into the cellular, molecular, genetic, and epigenetic mechanisms involved in cardiac arrhythmias.

Prof. Dr. Diego Franco Jaime
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Hearts is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • arrhythmias
  • atrial fibrillation
  • ventricular fibrillation
  • longQT syndrome
  • Brugada syndrome
  • ion channels
  • microRNAs
  • lncRNAs
  • transcriptional regulation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Molecular Determinants of Cardiac Arrhythmias
Hearts 2020, 1(3), 146-148; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/hearts1030014 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 501
Abstract
Cardiac arrhythmias are defined as electrical disorders of the pumping heart, including therein a wide range of physiopathological entities [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Determinants of Cardiac Arrhythmias)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Molecular Basis of Atrial Fibrillation Initiation and Maintenance
Hearts 2021, 2(1), 170-187; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/hearts2010014 - 23 Mar 2021
Viewed by 304
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, largely associated to morbidity and mortality. Over the past decades, research in appearance and progression of this arrhythmia have turned into significant advances in its management. However, the incidence of AF continues to increase [...] Read more.
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, largely associated to morbidity and mortality. Over the past decades, research in appearance and progression of this arrhythmia have turned into significant advances in its management. However, the incidence of AF continues to increase with the aging of the population and many important fundamental and translational underlaying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we review recent advances in molecular and cellular basis for AF initiation, maintenance and progression. We first provide an overview of the basic molecular and electrophysiological mechanisms that lead and characterize AF. Next, we discuss the upstream regulatory factors conducting the underlying mechanisms which drive electrical and structural AF-associated remodeling, including genetic factors (risk variants associated to AF as transcriptional regulators and genetic changes associated to AF), neurohormonal regulation (i.e., cAMP) and oxidative stress imbalance (cGMP and mitochondrial dysfunction). Finally, we discuss the potential therapeutic implications of those findings, the knowledge gaps and consider future approaches to improve clinical management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Determinants of Cardiac Arrhythmias)
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Open AccessReview
Optical Mapping in hiPSC-CM and Zebrafish to Resolve Cardiac Arrhythmias
Hearts 2020, 1(3), 181-199; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/hearts1030018 - 21 Dec 2020
Viewed by 709
Abstract
Inherited cardiac arrhythmias contribute substantially to sudden cardiac death in the young. The underlying pathophysiology remains incompletely understood because of the lack of representative study models and the labour-intensive nature of electrophysiological patch clamp experiments. Whereas patch clamp is still considered the gold [...] Read more.
Inherited cardiac arrhythmias contribute substantially to sudden cardiac death in the young. The underlying pathophysiology remains incompletely understood because of the lack of representative study models and the labour-intensive nature of electrophysiological patch clamp experiments. Whereas patch clamp is still considered the gold standard for investigating electrical properties in a cell, optical mapping of voltage and calcium transients has paved the way for high-throughput studies. Moreover, the development of human-induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) has enabled the study of patient specific cell lines capturing the full genomic background. Nevertheless, hiPSC-CMs do not fully address the complex interactions between various cell types in the heart. Studies using in vivo models, are therefore necessary. Given the analogies between the human and zebrafish cardiovascular system, zebrafish has emerged as a cost-efficient model for arrhythmogenic diseases. In this review, we describe how hiPSC-CM and zebrafish are employed as models to study primary electrical disorders. We provide an overview of the contemporary electrophysiological phenotyping tools and discuss in more depth the different strategies available for optical mapping. We consider the current advantages and disadvantages of both hiPSC-CM and zebrafish as a model and optical mapping as phenotyping tool and propose strategies for further improvement. Overall, the combination of experimental readouts at cellular (hiPSC-CM) and whole organ (zebrafish) level can raise our understanding of the complexity of inherited cardiac arrhythmia disorders to the next level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Determinants of Cardiac Arrhythmias)
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