Special Issue "Heritage Building Information Modeling (HBIM)"

A special issue of Heritage (ISSN 2571-9408). This special issue belongs to the section "Architectural Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Stefano Brusaporci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Construction-Architectural and Environmental Engineering, L'Aquila University, 67100 L'Aquila AQ, Italy
Interests: heritage conservation; architectural surveying; 3D modeling; BIM; HBIM; VR; AR
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Pamela Maiezza
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Construction-Architectural and Environmental Engineering, L'Aquila University, 67100 L'Aquila AQ, Italy
Interests: architectural heritage; surveying; 3D modeling; HBIM; computer-based visualization; VR; AR
Dr. Alessandra Tata
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Construction-Architectural and Environmental Engineering, L'Aquila University, 67100 L'Aquila AQ, Italy
Interests: Architectural heritage; 3D modeling; HBIM; visual parametric programming; VR; AR

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Building Information Modelling (BIM) is a process that has become an essential reference in the AEC architecture, engineering and construction sector (BIM Toolkit 2014-15; EUBIM Taskgroup, 2017; 2014/24/EU; UNI 11337:2017). The reasons for this growing interest are due to its undisputed potential as a control upon the entire process of new building design, construction, maintenance, management, and disposal. Thanks to parametric objects enriched with both qualitative and quantitative information, BIM led to the development of a new way of working: a process based on real time interaction between all stages of the building process, where the BIM informative model is the inter-operable shared 3D interface that enables architectural, structural and systems computing.

However, historical buildings are the result of modification and stratification processes carried out over time. They are the witnesses of historical events and of cultures that have occurred over the centuries; therefore they embody tangible and intangible values. The study of architectural heritage is based on an history-critical methodological approach. The survey of the building plays an essential role: according to archival documentation, and geometrical and constructive analysis, interpretative models describe the architectural, historical, and material characteristics. This different methodological approach to architectural heritage is not fully supported by BIM software and platforms, designed to manage processes for new buildings. Therefore, the study of the potential offered by BIM for documentation, conservation, interpretation, presentation, enhancement, maintenance, management, and restoration design is an open field.

In recent years, many studies used BIM applied to existing buildings, and the wording HBIM (intended both as Historical BIM or Heritage BIM) has emerged and is currently used. The main issues that need studying relate to: exhaustive and economic as-built 3D modeling of historic settlements (often with complex shapes) from point clouds; modeling architectural and constructive elements realized with craft procedures; their parametrization and computing into BIM environments; implementing historical databases.

In conclusion, the HBIM procedure requires a different theoretical–methodological approach from the original BIM. Architectural heritage (from ancient times to the recent past), constitutes a large part of the world's built heritage. BIM offers a potential operative and methodological revolution in building studies and design, therefore defining solutions, workflows, protocols, and best practices for HBIM is not only a current hot topic but also a necessity.

Topics:

  • HBIM modeling from point clouds;
  • HBIM objects, semantization;
  • HBIM objects, levels of development;
  • HBIM parametric and visual programming;
  • HBIM databases;
  • HBIM interoperability;
  • HBIM transparency of information;
  • HBIM reliability of geometry and information;
  • HBIM procedures;
  • HBIM standards;
  • HBIM for conservation, restoration, maintenance, management, and enhancement.

Prof. Stefano Brusaporci
Dr. Pamela Maiezza
Dr. Alessandra Tata
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Heritage is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
A Scan-to-BIM Methodology Applied to Heritage Buildings
Heritage 2020, 3(1), 47-67; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage3010004 - 06 Feb 2020
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 3243
Abstract
Heritage buildings usually have complex (non-parametric) geometries that turn their digitization through conventional methods in inaccurate and time-consuming processes. When it comes to the survey and representation of historical assets, remote sensing technologies have been playing key roles in the last few years: [...] Read more.
Heritage buildings usually have complex (non-parametric) geometries that turn their digitization through conventional methods in inaccurate and time-consuming processes. When it comes to the survey and representation of historical assets, remote sensing technologies have been playing key roles in the last few years: 3D laser scanning and photogrammetry surveys save time in the field, while proving to be extremely accurate at registering non-regular geometries of buildings. However, the efficient transformation of remote-sensing data into as-built parametric smart models is currently an unsolved challenge. A pragmatic and organized Historic Building Information Modeling (HBIM) methodology is essential in order to obtain a consistent model that can bring benefits and integrate conservation and restoration work. This article addresses the creation of an HBIM model of heritage assets using 3D laser scanning and photogrammetry. Our findings are illustrated in one case study: The Engine House Paços Reais in Lisbon. The paper first describes how and what measures should be taken to plan a careful scan-to-HBIM process. Second, the description of the remote-sensing survey campaign is conducted accordingly and is aimed at a BIM output, including the process of data alignment, cleaning, and merging. Finally, the HBIM modeling phase is described, based on point cloud data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage Building Information Modeling (HBIM))
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Article
Built Information Modeling for the 3D Reconstruction of Modern Railway Stations
Heritage 2019, 2(3), 2298-2310; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage2030141 - 06 Aug 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1531
Abstract
The BIM process applied to the built environment represents a much debated topic in the last decade, but it still contains unanswered questions. National and international frameworks introduced standards mainly focused on the levels of detail definition related to new project, leaving a [...] Read more.
The BIM process applied to the built environment represents a much debated topic in the last decade, but it still contains unanswered questions. National and international frameworks introduced standards mainly focused on the levels of detail definition related to new project, leaving a wide interpretation on the 3D reconstruction of existing building. On the other hand, the increase in the use of this modeling approach and the possible expansion of this application in the nearly future lead to predict a significant rise in built field, requiring a general assessment both on global methodology and on its peculiarities. Starting from the complete description and analysis of two modern railway architectures, based on integrated survey, 2D representation up to 3D modeling in BIM environments, the article tries to highlight the limits in the 3D BIM modeling applied on existing construction, suggesting possible solutions in relation with the obtained results. The process is critically evaluated in each passage, in order to focus the BIM research areas useful for built environment analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage Building Information Modeling (HBIM))
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Article
Informative Models for Architectural Heritage
Heritage 2019, 2(3), 2067-2089; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage2030125 - 23 Jul 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1469
Abstract
BIM (Building Information Modeling) processes are the most effective way to know existing architectural structures, integrating the most advanced potentials of 3D modeling and the structured storage of heterogeneous information. Many HBIM (Heritage Building Information Modeling) applications lead to the systematization of survey [...] Read more.
BIM (Building Information Modeling) processes are the most effective way to know existing architectural structures, integrating the most advanced potentials of 3D modeling and the structured storage of heterogeneous information. Many HBIM (Heritage Building Information Modeling) applications lead to the systematization of survey data, even though a univocal working method is not yet clearly defined. This research considers the decomposition of architecture, based on structured criteria, and its reconstruction, through ideal models, as the main moments of the HBIM process. This hypothesis is verified through a procedure that links the survey 3D data with the characteristics of the ideal HBIM model, which allows a continuous comparison between the project model and as-built. The research provides for the setting up of a general methodology that, according to a growing approach to the complexity of the analyzed buildings, compares the process followed on two architectural structures. The study analyzes some important HBIM issues: The relationship between the semantic modeling and the surfaces’ continuity of architectural heritage; the relationship between the elements standardization, geometric irregularities, and material heterogeneity; the reliability of the built models; and the evaluation of the gap between an ideal model and the objective accuracy of surveying. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage Building Information Modeling (HBIM))
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Article
HBIM Development of A Brazilian Modern Architecture Icon: Glass House by Lina Bo Bardi
Heritage 2019, 2(3), 1927-1940; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage2030117 - 12 Jul 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3415
Abstract
Lina Bo Bardi’s Glass House (Casa de Vidro) is a National Historic Landmark designed and built in the late 1940s in São Paulo, Brazil. The house is one of the symbols of modern Brazilian mid-century architecture. It is a historiographical reference of the [...] Read more.
Lina Bo Bardi’s Glass House (Casa de Vidro) is a National Historic Landmark designed and built in the late 1940s in São Paulo, Brazil. The house is one of the symbols of modern Brazilian mid-century architecture. It is a historiographical reference of the history of modern architecture in Brazil. This article reports the experience, outcomes, challenges, benefits, and limitations of the Heritage Building Information Modeling (HBIM) process. The HBIM was developed for Lina’s Glass House considering the following steps: modeling planning; data acquisition; model elaboration; recording of pathologies and damage; data management; documentation process. The HBIM developed includes historical information and geometric data from direct measurements, laser scanning, photographic survey, and pathologies documentation. The model allows professionals responsible for architecture, conservation, and restoration to access integrated information on projects and the current condition of the buildings easily and quickly. Good precision was achieved for important building elements, contributing to maintenance and restoration actions. This experience allowed the development of an integrated workflow of activities for collecting, processing, recording, and managing information that may serve as a baseline for future projects for the documentation of modernist buildings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage Building Information Modeling (HBIM))
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