Special Issue "SPECT and PET Imaging of Small Animals"

A special issue of Journal of Imaging (ISSN 2313-433X). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Imaging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. George Kastis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center of Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens GR-11527, Greece
Interests: PET and SPECT imaging; small-animal imaging; multimodality imaging; molecular imaging; image reconstruction
Dr. Anastasios Gaitanis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
PET/CT Department and Small Animal PET/CT Unit, Centre for Clinical Research, Experimental Surgery & Translational Research, Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens (BRFAA), Athens GR-11527, Greece
Interests: iterative reconstruction algorithms in PET; medical image processing; radiomics; clinical and preclinical PET/CT
Dr. Nicholas E. Protonotarios
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center of Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens GR-11527, Greece
Interests: mathematical methods in medical image reconstruction; analytic reconstruction methods for PET and SPECT; emission tomography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past two decades, there has been a great demand for dedicated small-animal imaging systems for biomedical research applications. Several commercial and research small-animal imaging systems have recently emerged, including PET, PET/CT, and PET/MR, as well as SPECT and SPECT/CT scanners. These small-animal imaging modalities are powerful tools providing crucial biological and physiological information to researchers. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of small animals has become an important tool in biomedical research.

There are many preclinical applications of small-animal PET and SPECT systems, for example, in the areas of cardiology, neurology, and oncology. Small-animal imaging focuses on the study of various diseases like cancer, with a tremendous impact on applications such as drug development. Furthermore, small-animal imaging systems facilitate the monitoring of pharmacological and therapeutic intervention for these diseases. In recent years, there has been an increased demand for improved drug development and for in vivo monitoring of internal organs’ morphological and functional characteristics. In this direction, there are several aspects of medicine that can be thoroughly explored by microPET and microSPECT systems, including diagnosis and novel therapeutic interventions. Therefore, therapeutics, clinical trials, and translational research can greatly benefit from small-animal imaging. The future of small-animal imaging lies in the upgrade of relevant hardware and software, in the development of novel applications, and in the improvement of camera sensitivity, spatial resolution, and sophisticated image reconstruction.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present novel and diverse research articles that demonstrate new instrumentation developments, imaging protocols, reconstruction algorithms, and imaging applications in small-animal PET and SPECT imaging. This is not limited to special application areas.

Dr. George Kastis
Dr. Anastasios Gaitanis
Dr. Nicholas E. Protonotarios
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Imaging is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Small-animal imaging (i.e., PET- and SPECT-based scanners, instrumentation)
  • Small-animal imaging applications (i.e., drug discovery, quantification)
  • Radionuclide imaging
  • Imaging protocols
  • Image reconstruction
  • Image processing
  • Radiomics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Brief Report
Validation of Image Qualities of a Novel Four-Mice Bed PET System as an Oncological and Neurological Analysis Tool
J. Imaging 2021, 7(3), 43; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jimaging7030043 - 26 Feb 2021
Viewed by 402
Abstract
Background: Micro-positron emission tomography (micro-PET), a small-animal dedicated PET system, is used in biomedical studies and has the quantitative imaging capabilities of radiotracers. A single-bed system, commonly used in micro-PET, is laborious to use in large-scale studies. Here, we evaluated the image [...] Read more.
Background: Micro-positron emission tomography (micro-PET), a small-animal dedicated PET system, is used in biomedical studies and has the quantitative imaging capabilities of radiotracers. A single-bed system, commonly used in micro-PET, is laborious to use in large-scale studies. Here, we evaluated the image qualities of a multi-bed system. Methods: Phantom imaging studies were performed to assess the recovery coefficients (RCs), uniformity, and spill-over ratios (SORs) in water- and air-filled chambers. 18F-FDG and 18F-FPEB PET images of xenograft and normal mice from the multi-bed and single-bed systems were compared. Results: For small diameters (< 3 mm), the RC values between the two systems differed significantly. However, for large diameters (> 4 mm), there were no differences in RC values between the two systems. Uniformity and SORs of both systems were within the tolerance limit of 15%. In the oncological study, the estimation of 18F-FDG uptake in the tumor was significantly lower in the multi-bed system than that in the single-bed system. However, 18F-FDG PET in xenograft mice with tumor size > 4 mm revealed the variation between subjects within the multi-bed system group to be less than 12%. In the neurological study, SUV for the multi-bed group was 25–26% lower than that for the single-bed group; however, inter-object variations within the multi-bed system were below 7%. Conclusions: Although the multi-bed system showed lower estimation of radiotracer uptake than that of the single-bed system, the inter-subject variations were within acceptable limits. Our results indicate that the multi-bed system can be used in oncological and neurological studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SPECT and PET Imaging of Small Animals)
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