Special Issue "Polymers in Nanocarrier Systems"

A special issue of Macromol (ISSN 2673-6209).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Aristeidis Papagiannopoulos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, 11635 Athens, Greece
Interests: nanostructured biomaterials; polysaccharides; proteins; nanoparticles; biointerfaces; biopolymer fluids; hydrogels; small-angle neutron scattering; rheology; microrheology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polymers are broadly used to produce nanocarriers of pharmaceutical and nutritional compounds and substances with combined properties, i.e., nutraceuticals and theranostics. They are amenable to chemical modification, they create soft structures that can accommodate bioactive compounds and live-matter and they may spontaneously self-assemble in nanostructures that can be used in a wide range of applications.  Polymer-based materials and nanomaterials are often designed to respond to external stimuli such as temperature and pH and, therefore, can be tuned to release their cargo under specified conditions. Macromolecular nanosystems are also used to carry biological macromolecules, e.g., proteins and genes, in many occasions making use of physical interactions, usually electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. In addition, polymeric nanosystems include coating and functionalization of quantum dots and metallic nanoparticles.

Currently, polymer nanocarriers investigations focus on micro/nano- particles/capsules/gels, hydrogels and nanocomposite materials with potential in tissue regeneration, treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, wound healing, agrochemical industry, food science, etc. The Special Issue welcomes contributions related to nanomaterials that are based on natural, synthetic, or hybrid macromolecules and are designed as carriers of active compounds including (while not being restricted to) polymer synthesis, nanocarrier formation, characterization, encapsulation, and release of loaded compound and applications opportunities.

Dr. Aristeidis Papagiannopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Macromol is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanoparticles
  • Nanogels
  • Hydrogels
  • Light scattering
  • Small-angle scattering
  • Synthesis
  • Self-assembly
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Nutrients
  • Diagnostic

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Poly(2-oxazoline)-Based Amphiphilic Gradient Copolymers as Nanocarriers for Losartan: Insights into Drug–Polymer Interactions
Macromol 2021, 1(3), 177-200; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/macromol1030014 - 01 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 562
Abstract
The current study is focused on the development of highly stable drug nanocarriers by encapsulating losartan potassium (LSR) into an amphiphilic biocompatible poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-grad-poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazoline) (PMeOxz72-grad-PPhOxz28) gradient copolymer (GC). Based on dynamic light scattering (DLS), the PMeOxz72-grad-PPhOxz28 (where [...] Read more.
The current study is focused on the development of highly stable drug nanocarriers by encapsulating losartan potassium (LSR) into an amphiphilic biocompatible poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-grad-poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazoline) (PMeOxz72-grad-PPhOxz28) gradient copolymer (GC). Based on dynamic light scattering (DLS), the PMeOxz72-grad-PPhOxz28 (where the subscripts denote %wt composition of the components) GC formed micelles and aggregates of 13 nm and 96 nm in aqueous milieu. The presence of hydrophobic LSR molecules altered the structural characteristics of the GC, modulating the organization of the polymeric components and revealing the formation of hyper micellar nanostructures in addition to micelles. The 2D-NOESY experiments evidenced intermolecular interactions between the phenyl ring of LSR with the phenyl group of PPhOxz and eminent correlations between the butyl chain of LSR with the phenyl group of PPhOxz and methylene group of PMeOxz, respectively. Additionally, NMR studies as a function of temperature demonstrated that the presence of hydrophilic PMeOxz segments in the gradient core of PMeOxz72-grad-PPhOxz28 nanoassemblies induced an increased fluidity of the core matrix, especially upon heating, thus causing water penetration, resulting in increased proton mobility. Lastly, the ultrasound release profile of LSR signified that a great amount of the encapsulated LSR is tightly bound to the PMeOxz72-grad-PPhOxz28 nanoassemblies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers in Nanocarrier Systems)
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Article
Effect of the Croton rhamnifolioides Essential Oil and the Inclusion Complex (OEFC/β-CD) in Antinociceptive Animal Models
Macromol 2021, 1(2), 94-111; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/macromol1020008 - 06 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 565
Abstract
This study aims to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of the C. rhamnifolioides leaf essential oil (OEFC) and the β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex (COEFC) and investigate the pain signaling pathways involved in the antinociceptive response. The effects of the OEFC and COEFC on the central [...] Read more.
This study aims to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of the C. rhamnifolioides leaf essential oil (OEFC) and the β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex (COEFC) and investigate the pain signaling pathways involved in the antinociceptive response. The effects of the OEFC and COEFC on the central nervous system (CNS) were determined by open field and rota-rod assays, and the antinociceptive effect was evaluated via the acetic acid-induced abdominal contortions, formalin, and hot plate models. Swiss (Mus musculus) male mice (20–30 g) were used in both trials. The OEFC (200 mg/kg/v.o-orally) and COEFC (83.5 mg/kg/v.o.) did not present alterations in the CNS. The OEFC (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/vo.) and COEFC (8.35, 41.75, and 83.5 mg/kg/v.o.) demonstrated antinociceptive effects in the abdominal contortions, formalin, and hot plate tests. The OEFC (25 mg/kg/v.o.) and COEFC (8.35 mg/kg/v.o.) doses showed that the antinociceptive effect involves the activation of the opioid, cholinergic, and vanilloid systems, as well as the L-arginine/NO and α-2 adrenergic receptor pathways. The antinociceptive potential the OEFC and COEFC demonstrate possible alternatives for the therapy of pain. However, the COEFC presented more significant effects at lower doses than the isolated OEFC, where this action may be justified by the properties and advantages of the complexation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers in Nanocarrier Systems)
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Review

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Review
Current Research on Polyelectrolyte Nanostructures: From Molecular Interactions to Biomedical Applications
Macromol 2021, 1(2), 155-172; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/macromol1020012 - 24 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 653
Abstract
Polyelectrolytes have been at the center of interdisciplinary research for many decades. In the field of polymer science and soft matter, they have provided the dimensions of electrostatic interactions, which opens a vast variety of opportunities for new physical properties and applications. In [...] Read more.
Polyelectrolytes have been at the center of interdisciplinary research for many decades. In the field of polymer science and soft matter, they have provided the dimensions of electrostatic interactions, which opens a vast variety of opportunities for new physical properties and applications. In biological matter, polyelectrolytes are present in many forms, from extracellular polysaccharides to complex DNA molecules and proteins. This review discusses the recent research on polyelectrolytes covering the fundamental level of their conformations and nanostructures, their molecular interactions with materials that have close relevance to bioapplications and their applications in the biomedical field. This approach is motivated by the fact that the polyelectrolyte research is constantly active in all the aforementioned levels and continually affects many critical scientific areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers in Nanocarrier Systems)
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