Special Issue "Evidence-Based Practice and Personalized Care"

A special issue of Nursing Reports (ISSN 2039-4403).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Athina Patelarou
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Hellenic Mediterranean University, Crete 71500, Greece
Interests: evidence-based practice; Nursing; Genetics; genomics; precision care; education; simulation; healthcare
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Nursing Reports Special Issue on “Evidence-Based Practice and Personalized Care” will focus on these two topics by bringing together experts who present research in these fields. 

The main goal of evidence-based practice (EBP) is the optimization of healthcare based on the integration of clinical expertise, patients’ values, and well-thought-out quality of scientific evidence that is followed in a clinical setting regarding a disease or a condition by all the medical professionals, including nursing personnel.

On the other hand, personalized care (PC) is considered to be an inevitability for health providers, as it aims to provide the best therapy per person or optimized for a group of patients with similar characteristics (stratified medicine). EBP and PC as complementary terms aim to the integration of best practices, based on the recent research evidence and the individual patient’s characteristics to improve the quality of healthcare, and ensure health promotion.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Epidemiological studies concerning quantitative or qualitative design investigating evidence-based practice and personalized care approaches in healthcare
  • Studies on the topic of health professional’s education regarding EBP and PC are also welcome
  • Studies investigating nurses’ and health professionals’ in general and EBP competencies
  • Studies investigating nurses’, and health professionals’ in general, and competencies in the field of precision medicine and PC
  • EBP intervention studies and innovations to health promotion and quality improvement
  • Studies and manuscripts highlighting future directions for these subjects are strongly encouraged.

We also welcome high-quality systematic/scoping/narrative reviews related to these issues.

Dr. Athina Patelarou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nursing Reports is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • education
  • evidence-based practice
  • nursing, personalized care
  • precision medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Technology-Enhanced Health Promotion for College Students: A Seed Development Project
Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11(1), 143-151; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep11010014 - 01 Mar 2021
Viewed by 542
Abstract
Obesity is an issue for young adults in the U.S. This population is particularly vulnerable to weight gain as they move from adolescence to young adulthood, especially as they transition from high school to college. Adopting a health promotion approach, a university-based cluster [...] Read more.
Obesity is an issue for young adults in the U.S. This population is particularly vulnerable to weight gain as they move from adolescence to young adulthood, especially as they transition from high school to college. Adopting a health promotion approach, a university-based cluster of researchers, community advocates, and a technology partner embarked on a two-year seed development project that focused on development, implementation, and evaluation of a web-based healthy lifestyle intervention for college students. Using a mixed-method design, two convenience samples of residential university students were recruited to participate in a 4-week intervention called Eat, Move, Live, in which they interacted with a newly-created comprehensive website about management of a healthy lifestyle. Participants’ post-intervention readiness for change increased by 15% (eating and life balance behaviors) to 23% (moving behaviors). Participants reported increased awareness of eating behaviors, and feelings of engagement in tracking their fruit and vegetable consumption. Findings suggest that technology may be utilized to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of achieving students’ individual goals related to healthy living. These preliminary findings have implications for increasing the development and implementation of technological approaches to health promotion for young adult students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice and Personalized Care)

Review

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Review
Inflammatory Bowel Disease Nurse—Practical Messages
Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11(2), 229-241; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nursrep11020023 - 01 Apr 2021
Viewed by 739
Abstract
Background and Objectives: Patients affected by inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are complex patients with various problems from a clinical and psychological point of view. This complexity must be addressed by a multidisciplinary team, and an inflammatory bowel disease nurse can be the [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: Patients affected by inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are complex patients with various problems from a clinical and psychological point of view. This complexity must be addressed by a multidisciplinary team, and an inflammatory bowel disease nurse can be the ideal professional figure to create a link between doctor and patient. The objective of this comprehensive review is to describe the figure of inflammatory bowel disease nurses and the various benefits that their introduction into a multidisciplinary team can bring, as well as a focus on how to become an inflammatory bowel disease nurse. Materials and Methods: A search on the PubMed database was performed by associating the terms “IBD” or “inflammatory bowel disease” with the Boolean term AND to the various issues addressed: “life impact”, “communication”, “fistulas”, “ostomy”, “diet”, “incontinence”, “sexuality”, “parenthood”, “fatigue”, “pain management”, and “follow up appointments”. Regarding the analysis of the benefits that the IBD nurse brings, the terms “IBD”, “inflammatory bowel diseases”, “Crohn’s disease”, and “ulcerative colitis” were used, associating them with the terms “benefit”, “costs”, “team”, and “patients”. Finally, regarding the focus on how to become an IBD nurse, an IBD nurse was interviewed. Results: An IBD nurse is a valuable nursing figure within the multidisciplinary team that takes care of patients with IBD because this nurse performs important functions from both a clinical assistance point of view (management of fistulas, ostomies, infusion of biological drugs) and an information and therapeutic education point of view (communication with patients, direct contact with patients by telephone or email). Furthermore, this nurse performs the “filter” function between doctor and patient, saving time for doctors that will be used for more outpatient visits. Conclusions: The introduction of an inflammatory bowel disease nurse is therefore recommended for multidisciplinary organizations dealing with the clinical course of patients suffering from IBD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Practice and Personalized Care)
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